Scientists unravel the mysteries of polymer strands in fuel cells

October 24, 2018, American Institute of Physics

Hydrogen fuel cells offer an attractive source of continuous energy for remote applications, from spacecraft to remote weather stations. Fuel cell efficiency decreases as the Nafion membrane, used to separate the anode and cathode within a fuel cell, swells as it interacts with water.

A Russian and Australian collaboration has now shown that this Nafion separator membrane partially unwinds some of its constituent fibers, which then protrude away from the surface into the bulk water phase for hundreds of microns.

The research team was led by a group in Russia together with Australian professor Barry Ninham from Australian National University in Canberra, a leading specialist in colloid and interface science. Their results were published this week in The Journal of Chemical Physics.

The research team began this project to examine a proposed hypothesis that attributed a new state of water to explain swelling of the Nafion membrane. Instead, they are the first to describe the growth of extending from the as it interacts with water. The number of fibers increases as a function of deuterium concentration of the water.

"To increase our understanding of these membranes, we needed to describe the molecular-level interaction of deuterated water with the polymer," Bunkin said. "Now that we know the structure of the 'exclusion zone', we can tailor the Nafion structure and its electrical properties by studying changes induced by ion-specific (Hofmeister) effects on its organization and function."

Nafion is the highest-performance commercially available hydrogen-oxide used to date in fuel cells. Its porous nature permits significant concentration of the electrolyte solution while separating the anode from the cathode, which allows the flow of electrons producing energy in the .

The researchers found the membrane is specifically sensitive to the deuterium content in the ambient water by unweaving the surface's structure. The polymer fibers extend from the membrane into the water. The effect is most pronounced in water with deuterium content between 100 and 1,000 parts per million.

For this study, the team developed a specialized laser instrumentation (photoluminescent UV spectroscopy) to characterize the polymer fibers along the membrane-water interface. Although the individual fibers were not observed directly due to the spatial limitation of the instrumentation, the team reliably detected their outgrowth into the .

"The significance of this work may provide an entrée into some very fundamental areas of biology and energy production about which we did not have a clue," Bunkin said.

Explore further: Water desalination picks up the pace

More information: N. F. Bunkin et al, Near-surface structure of Nafion in deuterated water, The Journal of Chemical Physics (2018). DOI: 10.1063/1.5042065

Related Stories

Water desalination picks up the pace

July 18, 2018

A membrane made of porous carbon-fiber structures grown on a porous ceramic substrate is more efficient at filtering seawater than existing similar membranes.

Fuel cells with PFIA-membranes

December 19, 2016

HZB scientists have teamed up with partners of 3M Company in order to explore the water management in an alternative proton exchange membrane type, called PFIA. The experiments have been conducted using the infrared facilities ...

Recommended for you

Meteorite source in asteroid belt not a single debris field

February 17, 2019

A new study published online in Meteoritics and Planetary Science finds that our most common meteorites, those known as L chondrites, come from at least two different debris fields in the asteroid belt. The belt contains ...

Diagnosing 'art acne' in Georgia O'Keeffe's paintings

February 17, 2019

Even Georgia O'Keeffe noticed the pin-sized blisters bubbling on the surface of her paintings. For decades, conservationists and scholars assumed these tiny protrusions were grains of sand, kicked up from the New Mexico desert ...

Archaeologists discover Incan tomb in Peru

February 16, 2019

Peruvian archaeologists discovered an Incan tomb in the north of the country where an elite member of the pre-Columbian empire was buried, one of the investigators announced Friday.

Where is the universe hiding its missing mass?

February 15, 2019

Astronomers have spent decades looking for something that sounds like it would be hard to miss: about a third of the "normal" matter in the Universe. New results from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory may have helped them ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.