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Evolution news

Why we make blood cells in our bones

In humans and other mammals, the stem cells that give rise to all blood cells are located in the bone. But in fish, blood stem cells are found in the kidney. Since the late 1970s, when biologists first realized that blood ...

dateJun 13, 2018 in Evolution
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Mixed signals from poisonous moths

Poisonous moths use bright red spots to warn predators to avoid them—but natural variation in these wing markings doesn't provide clear indications of how toxic individual moths might be—new research shows.

dateJun 04, 2018 in Evolution
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We are still evolving

From the colour of our eyes to the size of our brain, humans have been adapting to their environment, acquiring new abilities and losing others. We take a look at how evolution is still shaping us.

dateMay 29, 2018 in Evolution
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Dragonfly enzymes point to larger evolutionary dynamics

Although evolution has left dragonflies virtually unchanged for roughly 300 million years, new research by a UTM biologist reveals that understanding small physiological activities in these insects could reveal a deeper understanding ...

dateMay 24, 2018 in Evolution
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Evolution of a deadly virus

Infections caused by the mosquito-borne eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) are severe and have high mortality rates for horses—90 percent—and humans—33 percent, with significant brain damage in most human survivors.

dateMay 24, 2018 in Evolution
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'Uniquely human' muscles have been discovered in apes

Muscles once thought 'uniquely human' have been discovered in several ape species, challenging long-held theories on the origin and evolution of human soft tissues. The findings question the anthropocentric view that certain ...

dateMay 23, 2018 in Evolution
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How human brains became so big

The human brain is disproportionately large. And while abundant grey matter confers certain intellectual advantages, sustaining a big brain is costly—consuming a fifth of energy in the human body.

dateMay 23, 2018 in Evolution
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Why birds don't have teeth

Why did birds lose their teeth? Was it so they would be lighter in the air? Or are pointy beaks better for worm-eating than the jagged jaws of dinosaur ancestors?

dateMay 23, 2018 in Evolution
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Carbon dioxide and iron at the origin of life

Researchers at the University of Strasbourg have discovered a striking similarity between the way carbon dioxide (CO2) reacts with metals and the way that ancient microbes use CO2 to build their biomass, providing potential ...

dateMay 14, 2018 in Evolution
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Ancient skull shows early 'baleen whale' had teeth

Today's baleen whales (Mysticetes) support their massive bodies by filtering huge volumes of small prey from seawater using comb-like baleen in their mouths much like a sieve. But new evidence reported in the journal Current ...

dateMay 10, 2018 in Evolution
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Photosynthesis in plants key to speedy evolution

In a study of 11 different plant species, published in Molecular Biology and Evolution, researchers at the University of Oxford have shown that the speed at which plants evolve is linked to how good they are at photosynthesis.

dateApr 24, 2018 in Evolution
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Transfer learning meets livestock genomics

Researchers at Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) have developed a new computational method that predicts harmful mutations in mammalian species. As more livestock producers are using genetic tests ...

New method predicts evolution

Predicting chance-driven evolution seems impossible. Nevertheless, scientists from AMOLF in Amsterdam and the ESPCI in Paris have succeeded in making predictions about the evolution of a set of genes in E. coli. When and ...

Hybrid chickadees found deficient at learning and memory

For a long time, hybridization—when distinct species mate and produce offspring—was thought to be a mistake. Yet, advancements in genomic testing tools have revealed naturally occurring hybridization as a fairly common ...

Checking China's pollution by satellite
Marine reserves are vital—but under pressure
Organic crystals twist, bend, and heal
Rewiring plant defence genes to reduce crop waste
Electrical wire properties of DNA linked to cancer
In the gaping mouth of ancient crocodiles

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