Archaeology

Ancient stone tools from China provide earliest evidence of rice harvesting

A new Dartmouth College-led study analyzing stone tools from southern China provides the earliest evidence of rice harvesting, dating to as early as 10,000 years ago. The researchers identified two methods of harvesting rice, ...

Plants & Animals

Sharing is caring with fire ant venom

Venom is associated with being harmful, but red imported fire ants are using their venom for its medicinal benefits by sharing the toxic substance with their nestmates, according to a study published in the Journal of Insect ...

Hearing is believing: Sounds can alter our visual perception

Perception generally feels effortless. If you hear a bird chirping and look out the window, it hardly feels like your brain has done anything at all when you recognize that chirping critter on your windowsill as a bird.

Using light to manipulate neuron excitability

Nearly 20 years ago, scientists developed ways to stimulate or silence neurons by shining light on them. This technique, known as optogenetics, allows researchers to discover the functions of specific neurons and how they ...

Soft robot detects damage, heals itself

Cornell University engineers have created a soft robot capable of detecting when and where it was damaged—and then healing itself on the spot.

Researchers reveal how trauma changes the brain

Exposure to trauma can be life-changing—and researchers are learning more about how traumatic events may physically change our brains. But these changes are not happening because of physical injury; rather, the brain appears ...

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Medical Xpress

Tech Xplore

Scientists discover mechanism plants use to control 'mouths'

Because breathing is generally involuntary, we sometimes forget how complicated it is. But biologists are gaining new insight into the intricate process in plants, with big implications for how to feed the world in the future.

Heart attack on a chip shows how heart changes after the event

Researchers at the University of Southern California Alfred E. Mann Department of Biomedical Engineering have developed a "heart attack on a chip," a device that could one day serve as a testbed to develop new heart drugs ...

You're never too busy for self-gifting, study finds

People who are feeling tense due to demands at work or home tend not to reward themselves with gifts, new research finds—even though a new product or visit to the spa might be exactly what they need.

Examining the three dimensions of a flower

To better understand the evolution of flowers, a research team in biology from Université de Montréal, the Montreal Botanical Garden and McGill University have succeeded in using photogrammetry to quickly and precisely ...

Martian dust devil analogues in the Mojave Desert

In the Mojave Desert, the sun beats down on the ground and makes pockets of low pressure. Cool air rushes into these areas, where it warms and rises, creating vortices that pick up dust. These types of dust devils aren't ...

Linking African winds to Atlantic storms

High above the northern tropical countries of Africa, in warmer months, waves of low pressure can form in the atmosphere and blow westward toward the Atlantic. When these African easterly waves reach the ocean, tropical cyclones—including ...

People continue to matter, as accounting evolves

The role of the auditing profession is crucial for the proper functioning of capital and debt markets: one of the primary duties of auditors is to ensure the compliance of organizations' financial accounts to the law. And ...