Optics & Photonics

All-optical phase recovery and quantitative phase imaging performed instantly without a computer

Optical imaging and characterization of weakly scattering phase objects, such as isolated cells, bacteria and thin tissue sections frequently used in biological research and medical applications, have been of significant ...

Quantum Physics

Unique quantum material could enable ultra-powerful, compact computers

Information in computers is transmitted through semiconductors by the movement of electrons and stored in the direction of the electron spin in magnetic materials. To shrink devices while improving their performance—a goal ...

Mixing laser beams and X-ray beams

Unlike fictional laser swords, real laser beams do not interact with each other when they cross—unless the beams meet within a suitable material allowing for nonlinear light-matter interaction. In such a case, wave mixing ...

Researchers unveil a secret of stronger metals

Forming metal into the shapes needed for various purposes can be done in many ways, including casting, machining, rolling, and forging. These processes affect the sizes and shapes of the tiny crystalline grains that make ...

New clues in fight against lethal bacteria

New research from The Australian National University (ANU) could lead to better treatment options for a rare but very lethal type of bacterial infection. 

New method to kill cyberattacks in less than a second

A new method that could automatically detect and kill cyberattacks on our laptops, computers and smart devices in under a second has been created by researchers at Cardiff University.

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Electronics & Semiconductors
A step towards cheaper solar power
Electronics & Semiconductors
Making advanced electronics with water

MCM molecules impede the formation of DNA loops

The entire genomic material of a cell must be packed into a tiny cell nucleus in such a way, that on the one hand, it can be stored in an organized manner and, on the other hand, it can be transcribed, duplicated or repaired ...

Killer T vs. memory: DNA isn't destiny for T cells

Scientists at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have solved an immunology puzzle. A CD8+ T cell can have two functionally distinct daughter cells after it divides, despite the cells being genetically identical. The researchers ...

Function follows form in plant immunity

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research (MPIPZ) and the University of Cologne, Germany, have discovered a novel biochemical mechanism explaining how immune proteins defend plants against invading ...

Where do "Hawaiian box jellies" come from?

An insightful cross-disciplinary team of University of Hawai'i (UH) at Mānoa researchers, working for over a decade, published a study recently revealing that a key number of hours of darkness during the lunar cycle triggers ...

DNA contained in honey reveals honeybee health

Researchers from the B.S.R.C. "Alexander Fleming" in Greece have optimized a method to characterize DNA traces in honey, revealing the species that honeybees interact with. This collaborative work led by researcher Dr. Solenn ...

Hubble focuses on large lenticular galaxy 1023

This new NASA Hubble Space Telescope image looks at one of the nearest, massive lenticular galaxies to Earth, NGC 1023 some 36 million light-years away. Lenticular galaxies get their names from their edge-on appearance that ...

Why haven't we wiped out rabies yet?

Despite effective vaccines, the rabies virus kills around 59,000 people a year. We asked medical anthropologist Deborah Nadal why the disease is still a threat.