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From eye drops to potential leukaemia treatment

An active ingredient in eye drops that were being developed for the treatment of a form of eye disease has shown promise for treating an aggressive form of blood cancer. Scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute, University ...

date1 hour ago in Cancer
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Understanding dynamic stall at high speeds

When a bird in flight lands, it performs a rapid pitch-up maneuver during the perching process to keep from overshooting the branch or telephone wire. In aerodynamics, that action produces a complex phenomenon known as dynamic ...

date17 hours ago in Engineering
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Graphene's magic is in the defects

A team of researchers at the New York University Tandon School of Engineering and NYU Center for Neural Science has solved a longstanding puzzle of how to build ultra-sensitive, ultra-small electrochemical sensors with homogenous ...

date16 hours ago in Nanomaterials
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Robots are being programmed to adapt in real time

A robust, adaptable robot that responds to its environment on the fly and overcomes obstacles such as a broken leg without human intervention could be used to rescue people from an earthquake zone or clean up sites that are ...

EU agrees to ban most single-use plastics

EU countries and the European Parliament on Wednesday agreed details of a ban on single-use plastics, including plates, cutlery and drinking straws, in a bid to cut marine pollution.

China warns US against 'weaponising' space

China said Wednesday it opposed the "weaponisation" of space as it criticised US President Donald Trump's orders to create a new command centre for controlling military space operations.

How does your garden grow in space?

Astronauts in low-earth orbit could use a fresh salad to brighten up all those freeze-dried meals. But the microgravity space environment can affect plant growth in ways we're only beginning to understand. In research presented ...

When 'alien' insects attack Antarctica

Of the known alien (non-native) species found in Antarctica, a non-biting species of midge currently presents one of the highest risks to terrestrial ecosystems, researchers have found.

From eye drops to potential leukaemia treatment
Aggressive behavior brings emotional pain to the sadist

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Nightlights for stream dwellers? No, thanks

Artificial light at night isn't just a health problem for those of us sitting in bed scrolling through Instagram instead of hitting the sack—it hurts entire outdoor ecosystems.

New Zealand warns Google over naming murder accused

New Zealand warned Google to "take responsibility" for its news content Wednesday, after the internet giant broke a court order suppressing the name of a man charged with murdering a British backpacker.

Why are people religious? A cognitive perspective

The quick and easy answer to why people are religious is that God – in whichever form you believe he/she/they take(s) – is real and people believe because they communicate with it and perceive evidence of its involvement ...

Dream of augmented humans endures, despite sceptics

Brain implants, longer lives, genetically modified humans: for the prophets of transhumanism—the scientifically assisted evolution of humans beyond our current limitations—it is just a matter of time.

The Anglo-Saxons were worse than the Vikings

The Vikings invaded England in the 9th and 10th centuries. They plundered, raped and burned towns to the ground. Or at least, this is the story we know from school and popular culture.

Scary statistic: 90.5 percent of plastic is not recycled

The world's burgeoning plastic waste crisis has won the attention of Britain's Royal Statistical Society, which chose 90.5 percent—the proportion of plastic waste that has never been recycled—as its international statistic ...

Gene variant found in brain complicit in MS onset
How cholera bacteria make people so sick
How a single faulty gene can lead to lupus
Communication between neural networks
Protein portions: Feeling satisfied on fewer calories
Convincing Chinese smokers to kick the habit—by text

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