Environment

Research connects air pollution to worst Taiwanese drought in nearly 60 years

A new study co-published by researchers at the University at Albany and National Central University (NCU) has linked air pollution to the worst drought that Taiwan has experienced in more than a half-century.

Cell & Microbiology

A 'tasty' protein may lead to new ways to treat metabolic and immune diseases

The same taste-sensing molecule that helps you enjoy a meal from your favorite restaurant may one day lead to improved ways to treat diabetes and other metabolic and immune diseases.

Cosmic dawn occurred 250 to 350 million years after Big Bang

Cosmic dawn, when stars formed for the first time, occurred 250 million to 350 million years after the beginning of the universe, according to a new study led by researchers at University College London (UCL) and the University ...

Muscling up with nanoparticle-based anti-inflammatory therapy

Muscular dystrophies are a group of genetic diseases that lead to the progressive loss of muscle mass and function in patients, with the incurable Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), which affects all the body's muscles, primarily ...

Study reveals how immune cells can be trained to fight infections

The body's immune cells naturally fight off viral and bacterial microbes and other invaders, but they can also be reprogrammed or "trained" to respond even more aggressively and potently to such threats, report UCLA scientists ...

Making phone displays see better

Every few months smartphone companies release a newly designed phone—one with a larger screen, or a clearer camera. A selling point for many, the camera's capabilities are an important factor for consumers and amateur photographers ...

Researchers find the adhesions that build the brain's networks

The brain's neurons tend to get most of the scientific attention, but a set of cells around them called astrocytes—literally, star-shaped cells—are increasingly being viewed as crucial players in guiding a brain to become ...

When did the first COVID-19 case arise?

Using methods from conservation science, a new analysis suggests that the first case of COVID-19 arose between early October and mid-November, 2019 in China, with the most likely date of origin being November 17. David Roberts ...

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Medical Xpress

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Tech Xplore

Battle of the Pleiades against plant immunity

Mythological nymphs reincarnate as a group of corn smut proteins to launch a battle on maize immunity. One of these proteins appears to stand out among its sister Pleiades, much like its namesake character in Greek mythology. ...

Cosmic 'hand' hitting a wall

Motions of a remarkable cosmic structure have been measured for the first time, using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. The blast wave and debris from an exploded star are seen moving away from the explosion site and colliding ...

Protocells spring into action

A University of Bristol-led team of international scientists with an interest in protoliving technologies, has today published research which paves the way to building new semi-autonomous devices with potential applications ...

Ultralight material withstands supersonic microparticle impacts

A new study by engineers at MIT, Caltech, and ETH Zürich shows that "nanoarchitected" materials—materials designed from precisely patterned nanoscale structures—may be a promising route to lightweight armor, protective ...

Rude behavior at work is not an epidemic, new study shows

Rude behavior at work has come to be expected, like donuts in the breakroom. Two decades of research on employee relationships shows that 98 percent of employees experience rude behavior at work, but now a new study suggests ...

New findings unveil a missing piece of human prehistory

A joint research team led by Prof. Fu Qiaomei from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences sequenced the ancient genomes of 31 individuals from southern East ...

Versatile, fast and reliable SARS-CoV-2 antibody assay

During the continued progression of the Corona pandemic, rapid, inexpensive, and reliable tests will become increasingly important to determine whether people have the associated antibodies—either through infection or vaccination. ...

Employment realities don't match people's dreams

When it comes to career aspirations for teenagers, a University of Houston psychology researcher believes it's best to shoot for the moon, so you can at least land in the stars. The truth is the moon may sometimes be unreachable.

Russian forests are crucial to global climate mitigation

Russia is the world's largest forest country. Being home to more than a fifth of forests globally, the country's forests and forestry have enormous potential to contribute to making a global impact in terms of climate mitigation. ...

Water meters help scientists quantify river runoff

The Third Pole centered on the Tibetan Plateau is home to the headwaters of multiple rivers in Asia. Despite the importance of these rivers, scientists have not known exactly how much water flows out of the mountains of the ...