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Artificial cells act more like the real thing

Protocells—artificial cells—that are active and mimic living cells by moving independently and that are biocompatible and enzymatically active are now possible using an improved method developed by Penn State researchers.

Auxetic membranes: Paradoxical replacement tissue for medicine

A material that thickens when you pull on it seems to contradict the laws of physics. However, the so-called auxetic effect, which also occurs in nature, is interesting for a number of applications. A new Empa study recently ...

Hiring antibodies as nanotechnology builders

What if we could use antibodies as functional tools for nanotechnology applications? A group of researchers at the University of Rome Tor Vergata started from this simple question, and the results of their research are now ...

Economizing on iridium

Iridium is an ideal catalyst for the electrolytic production of hydrogen from water—but it is extremely expensive. But now a new kind of electrode made of highly porous material does an excellent job with just a hint of ...

Directional control of self-propelled protocells

Synthetic protocells can be made to move toward and away from chemical signals, an important step for the development of new drug-delivery systems that could target specific locations in the body. By coating the surface of ...

Precisely poking cells en masse to cure cancer

What if you could cure cancer by re-engineering patients' cells to better target and destroy their own tumors? With the advent of powerful new cellular engineering technologies, this is no longer the stuff of science fiction.

ELeCt-ing a better candidate for chemo delivery

Chemotherapy has been the backbone of cancer treatment for decades, but it is notorious for its toxicity to healthy cells, severe side effects, and poor targeting of the intended tumors. Efforts to improve chemotherapy's ...

Moving diagnostics out of the lab and into your hand

Handheld electrochemical sensors are part of the daily routine for millions of people with diabetes around the globe who monitor their blood sugar levels with electric glucometers. While such sensors have revolutionized at-home ...

Better biosensor technology created for stem cells

A Rutgers-led team has created better biosensor technology that may help lead to safe stem cell therapies for treating Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases and other neurological disorders.

Study points to new weapon in fight against lethal fungi

Researchers at Monash University have gained insights into how nanoparticles could be used to identify the presence of invasive and sometimes deadly microbes, and deliver targeted treatments more effectively.

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Nanomesh drug delivery provides hope against global antibiotic resistance
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Quantum dots technology to revolutionize healthcare and sensing technology
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Research identifies chemical mechanism that shows how iron in soils can immobilize arsenic
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Optical switch illuminates cell development
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Earth Sciences
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Three studies describe different parts of the 2018 Kīlauea caldera collapse
Plants & Animals
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Social Sciences
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Space Exploration
OSIRIS-REx mission explains Bennu's mysterious particle events
General Physics
New instrument extends LIGO's reach
Cell & Microbiology
Can a single-celled organism 'change its mind'? New study says yes
Quantum Physics
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Ecology
Wildlife in tropics hardest hit by forests being broken up
Environment
As China rapidly adopts clean energy, use of traditional stoves persists
Social Sciences
Link found between killings of unarmed black people by police and local babies born prematurely
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