Samsung to recover rare metals, components in Galaxy Note 7s

July 18, 2017 by Youkyung Lee
A man passes by advertisements of Samsung Electronics Galaxy Note Fan Edition at a mobile phone shop in Seoul, South Korea, Tuesday, July 18, 2017. Samsung Electronics said in a statement Tuesday, July 18, 2017, it will recover gold and other metals in the recalled Galaxy Note 7 and retrieve components from the fire-prone phones to reduce wastes. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

Samsung Electronics plans to recover gold and other metals and components from recalled Galaxy Note 7 smartphones to reduce waste.

The South Korean company said Tuesday that it expects to retrieve 157 tons of gold, silver, cobalt, copper and other metals from millions of smartphones that were recalled and discontinued last year after their batteries were found to be prone to catching fire.

It didn't say how it would use the retrieved metals.

The phones' display modules, , camera models and other components will be separated from the Note 7 for sale or recycling, Samsung said in a statement.

In another effort to reduce , Samsung has begun selling 400,000 units of Galaxy Note FE phones in South Korea made from unused parts of recalled Note 7 smartphones.

The Note 7 crisis was one of the biggest black eyes in Samsung's recent history, costing the company more than $5 billion. Airlines banned passengers from carrying Note 7s on flights due to safety concerns and millions of smartphones were shipped back to Samsung.

The phone recall fiasco prompted Greenpeace to urge the South Korean tech giant to sell longer lasting electronics products that are easier to repair and upgrade. Environmentalists fault smartphones for increasing the amount of tech waste, though some experts note that by replacing other appliances they may actually decrease the amount of high-tech-related rubbish overall. Samsung is the world's largest maker.

In this Oct. 11, 2016, file photo, Samsung Electronics Galaxy Note 7 smartphones are displayed at its shop in Seoul, South Korea. Samsung Electronics said in a statement Tuesday, July 18, 2017, it will recover gold and other metals in the recalled Galaxy Note 7 and retrieve components from the fire-prone phones to reduce wastes. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man, File)
In this Sept. 1, 2016, file photo, a man holds a Samsung's latest Galaxy Note 7 smartphone after dipping it in water to test its waterproofing features at a roadshow booth outside a shopping mall in Beijing. Samsung Electronics said in a statement Tuesday, July 18, 2017, it will recover gold and other metals in the recalled Galaxy Note 7 and retrieve components from the fire-prone phones to reduce wastes. (AP Photo/Andy Wong, File)
A Samsung Electronics Galaxy Note Fan Edition is seen at a mobile phone shop in Seoul, South Korea, Tuesday, July 18, 2017. Samsung Electronics said in a statement Tuesday, July 18, 2017, it will recover gold and other metals in the recalled Galaxy Note 7 and retrieve components from the fire-prone phones to reduce wastes. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

Explore further: Samsung to sell recycled Note 7 phone in South Korea at $611

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