Related topics: cells · breast cancer · cancer cells · protein

Toxins force construction of 'roads to nowhere'

Toxins released by a type of bacteria that cause diarrheal disease hijack cell processes and force important proteins to assemble into "roads to nowhere," redirecting the proteins away from other jobs that are key to proper ...

Newly discovered process brings immune cells up to speed

Cancer cells use an unusual mechanism to migrate into new tissue and form metastases there. The same process probably also keeps some immune cells on their toes. This is the result of a recent study led by the University ...

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Cell migration

Cell migration is a central process in the development and maintenance of multicellular organisms. Tissue formation during embryonic development, wound healing and immune responses all require the orchestrated movement of cells in particular directions to specific locations. Errors during this process have serious consequences, including mental retardation, vascular disease, tumor formation and metastasis. An understanding of the mechanism by which cells migrate may lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies for controlling , for example, invasive tumour cells. Cells often migrate in response to, and towards, specific external signals, a process called chemotaxis.

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