Calif court clears way for Google age bias trial

August 6, 2010

(AP) -- The California Supreme Court says a former Google Inc. manager can sue the search engine on claims he was fired because of his age.

The court ruled Thursday that Brian Reid's discrimination suit could go to trial, rejecting a lower court's decision that there wasn't enough evidence.

Reid, a former associate professor at Stanford University, sued Google in 2004, after losing his job as director of operations. He was 54. Reid alleges he was told he wasn't a good "cultural fit" at the Mountain View-based company.

The justices said the trial judge should've considered alleged comments by Reid's co-workers referring to him as an "old guy" and "fuddy-duddy."

, which denies the allegations, said it looks forward to demonstrating in "the legitimate, nondiscriminatory reasons" Reid was fired.

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