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Smaller and cheaper particle accelerators?

Traditionally, particle accelerators have relied on electric fields generated by radio waves to drive electrons and other particles close to the speed of light. But in radio-frequency machines there is an ...

dateApr 22, 2015 in General Physics
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Astronomers find runaway galaxies

We know of about two dozen runaway stars, and have even found one runaway star cluster escaping its galaxy forever. Now, astronomers have spotted 11 runaway galaxies that have been flung out of their homes ...

dateApr 23, 2015 in Astronomy
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Black hole hunters tackle a cosmic conundrum

Dartmouth astrophysicists and their colleagues have not only proven that a supermassive black hole exists in a place where it isn't supposed to be, but in doing so have opened a new door to what things were ...

dateApr 20, 2015 in Astronomy
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The overlooked third man

The horticulturist who came up with the concept of 'evolution by natural selection' 27 years before Charles Darwin did should be more widely acknowledged for his contribution, states a new paper by a King's ...

dateApr 20, 2015 in Evolution
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Thawing permafrost feeds climate change

Carbon, held in frozen permafrost soils for tens of thousands of years, is being released as Arctic regions of the Earth warm and is further fueling global climate change, according to a Florida State University ...

dateApr 23, 2015 in Earth Sciences
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The riddle of galactic thin–thick disk solved

A long-standing puzzle regarding the nature of disk galaxies has finally been solved by a team of astronomers led by Ivan Minchev from the Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam (AIP), using state-of-the-art ...

dateApr 24, 2015 in Astronomy
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Celestial fireworks celebrate Hubble's 25th anniversary

The glittering tapestry of young stars flaring to life in this new NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image aptly resembles an exploding shell in a fireworks display. This vibrant image of the star cluster Westerlund ...

Ten more years of real money

We will still be using "real" money for at least the next 5 to 10 years, but financial transactions carried out using mobile electronic devices, such as smart phones and tablet computers, will increasingly ...

Virtual telescope expands to see black holes

Astronomers building an Earth-size virtual telescope capable of photographing the event horizon of the black hole at the center of our Milky Way have extended their instrument to the bottom of the Earth—the ...

High mountains warming faster than expected

High elevation environments around the world may be warming much faster than previously thought, according to members of an international research team including Raymond Bradley, director of the Climate System ...

Parents sound off on mobile device use by children
Program puts a dent in summer hunger
Electronic cigarettes gaining in popularity among teens
New insight into how brain makes memories
Babies feel pain 'like adults'
Study sheds new light on brain's source of power
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Innovation boosts Wi-Fi bandwidth tenfold

Researchers at Oregon State University have invented a new technology that can increase the bandwidth of WiFi systems by 10 times, using LED lights to transmit information.

Oldest fossils controversy resolved

New analysis of world-famous 3.46 billion-year-old rocks by researchers from The University of Western Australia is set to finally resolve a long-running evolutionary controversy.

Big butts aren't everything to male baboons

While the female baboon's big red bottom may be an eyesore to some, it has an aphrodisiac effect on her mates. Biologists have long thought that baboon males prefer females with bigger backsides as the mark ...

Neuroscientists create the sensation of invisibility
Major depression leaves a metabolic mark
Babies as young as 6 months using mobile media

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