Sharp unveils TV positioned between HD and 4K

Jan 06, 2014 by Ryan Nakashima

Japanese electronics maker Sharp is bridging the gap between expensive 4K TVs and HD versions with an in-between solution that's also priced in the middle.

Its new Quattron+ technology doubles the vertical resolution of a high-definition set by chopping the existing pixels in half. Meanwhile, it uses a to double the horizontal resolution for everything but certain parts of an image.

According to Sharp, that gives its Quattron+ televisions 16 million subpixels, versus 8 million for its Quattron line and 6 million for HD. It's a middle ground before stepping up to a 4K TV, also known as "ultra HD," which has 24 million subpixels.

Quattron+ TVs can receive 4K signals. A 70-inch model is expected to retail for about $3,200.

Explore further: Samsung sells 110-inch ultra-HD TV for $150,000 (Update)

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Samsung, LG to unveil 105-inch curved TVs

Dec 19, 2013

Samsung Electronics Co. and LG Electronics Inc. said their curved TVs will get bigger and sport the sharpness four times the regular HD television sets.

A TV 4 times sharper than HD

Apr 26, 2012

Now that you've got a high-definition TV, you may want to start saving up for a super-high-definition one.

Sony uses movie studio to press ultra-HD advantage

Jan 08, 2013

Sony Corp. is finally pressing its advantage as a conglomerate that owns both high-tech gadgets and the content that plays on them by being the only electronics maker to offer ultra-HD TVs—and a way to ...

Recommended for you

Xbox One update is big on friends, Blu-ray 3D support

Jul 21, 2014

An Xbox One August update is arriving for early-access users. Microsoft said, "We're looking forward to hearing feedback on features before we roll them out to all Xbox One consoles next month and beyond." ...

How Kindle Unlimited compares with Scribd, Oyster

Jul 18, 2014

Amazon is the latest—and largest—company to offer unlimited e-books for a monthly fee. Here's how Kindle Unlimited, which Amazon announced Friday, compares with rivals Scribd and Oyster.

User comments : 0