Call for Atlantic tuna quotas to be retained

Nov 11, 2013
Environmental activists demonstrate on the river Seine in Paris, on November 21, 2010, to protest the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tuna (ICCAT) in Paris

A leading environmental group on Monday called on authorities to keep tough fishing quotas on Atlantic tuna when governments meet next week to set industry rules.

The US-based Pew Charitable Trusts called on the 47-member governments of the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas to maintain catch limits on endangered bluefin .

The group will meet in Cape Town next week under pressure from the and countries to loosen rules.

"The recommended quotas should remain at current levels so that there is a stability," said Pew's Jamie Gibbon.

Since the industrial fishing era began, stocks of Bluefin tuna are thought to have fallen by at least 85 percent in the Mediterranean and eastern Atlantic, where they come to spawn in the warmer waters.

Some 80 percent of Atlantic bluefin tuna fished out of the Mediterranean ends up in the Japanese sushi market.

The European Union agreed in 2007 to restrict the fishing of in the hope of reviving dwindling stocks, a measure which hit some member nations hard.

Fish stocks now seem to have stabilised, which a new scientific count is expected to confirm next February.

Spain, Portugal, Italy, Greece and Malta favour increasing quotas, although the EU as a whole is not in favour.

A sushi chef serves up tuna sushi made from a bluefin tuna at a popular Japanese chain near Tokyo's Tsukiji fish market on January 5, 2013

But Pew warned that the is not out of danger yet, citing a study which appeared to show fishing between 2008 and 2011 exceeded quotas by 57 percent.

"This will really be a test for governments to see whether they will be willing to follow science," said the organisation's Elizabeth Wilson.

Pew also called for curbs on porbeagle shark fishing, after the endangered fish was listed on the Convention for International Trade on Endangered Species (CITES) this year.

Explore further: Pacific nations agree to cut bluefin tuna catches

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Bluefin tuna quotas up for renewal

Nov 12, 2012

Fishing nations meet in Morocco this week to thrash out tuna quotas as experts urge maintaining bluefin catch limits amid promising signs of the decimated species making a comeback.

Atlantic bluefin tuna quota to rise slightly

Nov 19, 2012

Annual catches of Atlantic bluefin tuna will rise slightly from next year, green groups said Monday at a meeting of countries that hunt the much-prized but threatened species.

Pacific nations agree to cut bluefin tuna catches

Sep 05, 2013

Asia-Pacific fishing nations and territories agreed on Thursday to cut catches of young bluefin tuna by 15 percent, with an agreement environmentalists said would not stop overfishing.

Far more bluefin sold than reported caught: report

Oct 18, 2011

More than twice as many tonnes of Atlantic bluefin tuna were sold last year compared with official catch records for this threatened species, according to a report released on Tuesday.

Overfishing on the menu of Istanbul conference

Nov 11, 2011

Hundreds of representatives of countries involved in bluefin tuna fishing, international organisations and NGOs met here Friday on how to improve catch controls and protect endangered species.

Recommended for you

Plants with dormant seeds give rise to more species

Apr 18, 2014

Seeds that sprout as soon as they're planted may be good news for a garden. But wild plants need to be more careful. In the wild, a plant whose seeds sprouted at the first warm spell or rainy day would risk disaster. More ...

Scientists tether lionfish to Cayman reefs

Apr 18, 2014

Research done by U.S. scientists in the Cayman Islands suggests that native predators can be trained to gobble up invasive lionfish that colonize regional reefs and voraciously prey on juvenile marine creatures.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Biologists help solve fungi mysteries

(Phys.org) —A new genetic analysis revealing the previously unknown biodiversity and distribution of thousands of fungi in North America might also reveal a previously underappreciated contributor to climate ...

Researchers successfully clone adult human stem cells

(Phys.org) —An international team of researchers, led by Robert Lanza, of Advanced Cell Technology, has announced that they have performed the first successful cloning of adult human skin cells into stem ...

NASA's space station Robonaut finally getting legs

Robonaut, the first out-of-this-world humanoid, is finally getting its space legs. For three years, Robonaut has had to manage from the waist up. This new pair of legs means the experimental robot—now stuck ...

Ex-Apple chief plans mobile phone for India

Former Apple chief executive John Sculley, whose marketing skills helped bring the personal computer to desktops worldwide, says he plans to launch a mobile phone in India to exploit its still largely untapped ...

Filipino tests negative for Middle East virus

A Filipino nurse who tested positive for the Middle East virus has been found free of infection in a subsequent examination after he returned home, Philippine health officials said Saturday.

Egypt archaeologists find ancient writer's tomb

Egypt's minister of antiquities says a team of Spanish archaeologists has discovered two tombs in the southern part of the country, one of them belonging to a writer and containing a trove of artifacts including reed pens ...

Airbnb rental site raises $450 mn

Online lodging listings website Airbnb inked a $450 million funding deal with investors led by TPG, a source close to the matter said Friday.