Discovery crew arrives at Cape Canaveral

July 10, 2005
Discovery crew arrives at Cape Canaveral

At approximately 6:30 p.m. this evening, the crew of STS-114 arrived at Kennedy Space Center in Florida for the July 13 launch of Space Shuttle Discovery.

Image above: Mission Commander Eileen Collins and her crew spoke to a crowd of reporters after landing at the Shuttle Landing Facility on NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, Fla. Image credit: NASA/KSC

STS-114 Crew:

+ Commander Eileen Collins,
+ Pilot James Kelly,
+ Mission Specialist Charles Camarda,
+ Mission Specialist Wendy Lawrence,
+ Mission Specialist Soichi Noguchi,
+ Mission Specialist Steve Robinson,
+ Mission Specialist Andy Thomas.

Landing aboard a NASA Gulfstream II jet, the seven astronauts flew in from Houston a day early to avoid treacherous travel conditions caused by Hurricane Dennis. The crew members will spend their next four days at the Center making final preparations for Wednesday's flight to the International Space Station.

Liftoff of Space Shuttle Discovery on NASA's Return to Flight Mission is scheduled for 3:51 p.m. EDT July 13. With launch only days remaining, final preparations continue at Kennedy Space Center's Launch Pad 39B. Countdown preparations have begun in firing room 3 of the Launch Control Center in anticipation of the countdown beginning on Sunday at 6 p.m. at the T-43 hour mark.

Explore further: Mission team ready for Galileo launch

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