'Zombie' bacteria found able to kill other bacteria

(Phys.org)—A trio of researchers with the Hebrew University of Jerusalem has found that bacteria that die as a result of silver poisoning can serve as a means to continue to kill other bacteria in the same environment. ...

Spinning up antibacterial silver on glass

The antibacterial effects of silver are well established. Now, researchers at Yonsei University in Seoul, Republic of Korea, have developed a technique to coat glass with a layer of silver ions that can prevent growth of ...

Ions, not particles, make silver toxic to bacteria

(Phys.org) -- Rice University researchers have settled a long-standing controversy over the mechanism by which silver nanoparticles, the most widely used nanomaterial in the world, kill bacteria.

Silver nanoparticles trap mercury

(PhysOrg.com) -- Anyone who thinks amalgams are limited to tooth fillings is missing something: Amalgams, which are alloys of mercury and other metals, have been used for over 2500 years in the production of jewelry and for ...

New evidence for natural synthesis of silver nanoparticles

Nanoparticles of silver are being found increasingly in the environment—and in environmental science laboratories. Because they have a variety of useful properties, especially as antibacterial and antifungal agents, ...

Antibacterial silver nanoparticles are a blast

Writing in the International Journal of Nanoparticles, Rani Pattabi and colleagues at Mangalore University, explain how blasting silver nitrate solution with an electron beam can generate nanoparticles that are more effective ...

Do kitchen items shed antimicrobial nanoparticles after use?

Because of their antimicrobial and antifungal properties, silver nanoparticles measuring between one and 100 nanometers (billionth of a meter) in size, are being incorporated outside the United States into a variety of kitchen ...

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