Five pharaonic statue heads found in Egypt

Nov 17, 2013
An ancient statue of the Egyptian Pharoah Ramses II adorns the pylon of the Luxor Temple in Luxor, Egypt 14 December 2002.

A team of Egyptian and French archaeologists have found five heads of royal statues from the pharaonic era, officials from the antiquities ministry said on Saturday.

"The heads, which had crowns of Upper and Lower Egypt and were made from , were discovered" south of Luxor, Antiquities Minister Mohammed Ibrahim said in a statement.

The of the department of pharaonic antiquities, Mohammed Abdel Maqsud, said the heads measured 50 centimetres (20 inches) across and are estimated to be around 4,000 years old.

He said experts were studying them to determine if they belonged to decapitated statues found in the same location several years ago.

Explore further: Dig unearths 4,000 year old tomb of doctor to pharaohs

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

French archaeologists unearth pharaoh boat

Jul 25, 2012

French archaeologists have discovered a roughly 5,000-year-old pharaonic solar boat in an expedition in Abu Rawash, west of the Egyptian capital, the antiquities ministry said on Wednesday.

Egypt reopens historic Serapeum of Saqqara

Sep 20, 2012

Egypt on Thursday reopened the Serapeum of Saqqara, a vast underground necropolis south of Cairo dedicated to the bulls of Apis, after 11 years and complete renovation of the historic pharaonic site.

Recommended for you

Bloody souvenir not from decapitated French king: DNA

16 hours ago

Two centuries after the French people beheaded King Louis XVI and dipped their handkerchiefs in his blood, DNA analysis has thrown new doubt on the authenticity of one such rag kept as a morbid souvenir.

Archaeologists, tribe clash over Native remains

Apr 23, 2014

Archaeologists and Native Americans are clashing over Indian remains and artifacts that were excavated during a construction project in the San Francisco Bay Area, but then reburied at an undisclosed location.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Genetic code of the deadly tsetse fly unraveled

Mining the genome of the disease-transmitting tsetse fly, researchers have revealed the genetic adaptions that allow it to have such unique biology and transmit disease to both humans and animals.

Ocean microbes display remarkable genetic diversity

The smallest, most abundant marine microbe, Prochlorococcus, is a photosynthetic bacteria species essential to the marine ecosystem. An estimated billion billion billion of the single-cell creatures live i ...