Five pharaonic statue heads found in Egypt

Nov 17, 2013
An ancient statue of the Egyptian Pharoah Ramses II adorns the pylon of the Luxor Temple in Luxor, Egypt 14 December 2002.

A team of Egyptian and French archaeologists have found five heads of royal statues from the pharaonic era, officials from the antiquities ministry said on Saturday.

"The heads, which had crowns of Upper and Lower Egypt and were made from , were discovered" south of Luxor, Antiquities Minister Mohammed Ibrahim said in a statement.

The of the department of pharaonic antiquities, Mohammed Abdel Maqsud, said the heads measured 50 centimetres (20 inches) across and are estimated to be around 4,000 years old.

He said experts were studying them to determine if they belonged to decapitated statues found in the same location several years ago.

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