Cave divers search depths for the bones of the Ice Age

For thousands of years, the massive pelvis lay undisturbed at the bottom of the watery black pit. Approximately four feet across and weighing an estimated 80 pounds, it had once belonged to a giant ground sloth, an elephant-sized ...

Paleontologists solve pterosaur pelvis puzzle

Following a discovery in 2015 in Alberta's Dinosaur Provincial Park, Greg Funston puzzled for two years over a mysterious bone trying to identify the species of animal—as well as the part of the body—the bone belonged ...

New study shows that Richard III suffered from roundworm infection

The body of Richard III, who ruled England from 1483—85, was discovered in 2012 by archaeologists at the University of Leicester, and scientists have since been undertaking careful analysis of the remains, in an attempt ...

'Game-changer' in evolution from S. African bones

An analysis of 2 million-year-old bones found in South Africa offers the most powerful case so far in identifying the transitional figure that came before modern humans - findings some are calling a potential game-changer ...

Australopithecus Sediba could be direct ancestor of Homo

(PhysOrg.com) -- Last year Lee Berger from the University of the Witwatersrand and his team discovered the skeletal remains of two specimens they determined to be a new species of human called Australopithecus sediba. The ...

Students' sharp eyes restore dinosaur's rightful name

(PhysOrg.com) -- Three graduate students in paleontology blew dust off dinosaur toes found in 1924 to discover that something didn't quite add up. After examining a few more fossilized bones, they concluded that a 1970s reclassification ...

U of A students reaffirm the work of a 1920s paleontologist

Three University of Alberta paleontology graduate students blew the dust off an 85-year-old dinosaur find to discover the original researcher had it right and a 1970s revision of his work was wrong.

'Pelvis Has Left the Building'

(PhysOrg.com) -- New research shows that when two species of stickleback fish evolved and lost their pelvises and body armor, the changes were caused by different genes in each species. That surprised researchers, who expected ...

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Pelvis

The pelvis is an anatomical structure found in humans (see human pelvis) or in animals. It contains a large compound bone structure at the base of the spine, which is connected with the legs or rear limbs. This bony structure is called the pelvis skeleton or bony pelvis, and consists of os coxa, sacrum and coccyx.

The synsacrum is a skeletal structure, mainly described in birds and dinosaurs.

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