Work on connection between eye, brain wins $1 million prize

September 6, 2016

Four researchers based at U.S. and British universities are sharing a EUR1 million ($1.1 million) prize from a Portuguese foundation for work that has improved understanding of how our eyes send signals to the brain.

The award announced Tuesday went to John Flanagan of Harvard Medical School, Carol A. Mason of Columbia University, Carla Shatz of Stanford University and Christine Holt of Cambridge University.

The winners were praised for their ground-breaking work into how what our eyes see is transmitted to the . The research could unlock new neurological therapies to treat eyesight problems.

The Lisbon, Portugal-based Champalimaud Foundation's annual Vision Award was created in 2007 and claims to be one of the world's largest scientific prizes.

Explore further: Seven US-based researchers share $1.3M eyesight prize

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