Buffalo Zoo rhino calf from Cincinnati rhino sperm

June 13, 2014

(AP)—The Cincinnati Zoo says a female Indian rhino calf born recently in New York was produced by artificial insemination using sperm from a now-dead Cincinnati rhino.

Zoo officials call the calf born June 5 at the Buffalo Zoo a victory for endangered species.

The father was named Jimmy and died at the Cincinnati Zoo in 2004. His was frozen, stored and later taken to Buffalo.

The calf's 17-year-old mother is named Tashi. She previously conceived and successfully gave birth through natural breeding in 2004 and 2008. But her mate died, and Buffalo's new male Indian rhino hasn't reached .

Buffalo officials say the calf weighed 144 pounds at birth. They say there are only 59 Indian rhinos in captivity in North America and about 2,500 in the wild.

Explore further: Stillborn rhino delivered in Cincinnati

Related Stories

Death, tumors harm efforts to save rare rhinos

April 4, 2014

Efforts to save critically endangered Sumatran rhinoceroses were dealt a double blow this week with the death of one animal in a US zoo and the discovery of reproductive tumors in another.

Rare Sumatran rhino pregnancy offers hope to species

February 2, 2012

A Sumatran rhino which is 10-months pregnant is receiving special medical care after suffering two miscarriages, a conservationist said Thursday, fuelling hope for the critically-endangered species.

Recommended for you

Re-cloning of first cloned dog deemed successful thus far

November 22, 2017

(Phys.org)—A team of researchers with Seoul National University, Michigan State University and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has re-cloned the first dog to be cloned. In their paper published in the journal ...

Testing the advantage of being left-handed in sports

November 22, 2017

(Phys.org)—Sports scientist Florian Loffing with the Institute of Sport Science, University of Oldenburg in Germany has conducted a study regarding the possibility of left-handed athletes having an advantage over their ...

New discovery: Common jellyfish is actually two species

November 21, 2017

University of Delaware professor Patrick Gaffney and alumnus Keith Bayha, a research associate with the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History, have determined that a common sea nettle jellyfish is actually two ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.