Relief Web sites show huge Sept. upswing

Oct 31, 2005

Americans reached out and logged on during a turbulent September to help their fellow citizens.

Battered by hurricanes Katrina and Rita, the U.S. Gulf Coast region was given a boost by Americans across the country through donations, volunteerism and other gestures of support -- often shown online. According to the latest monthly analysis from comScore Media Metrix, visitation to sites offering relief and assistance to victims reached unprecedented levels in September 2005.

"The Internet's role in these disasters has been multi-dimensional," said Peter Daboll, president and CEO of comScore Media Metrix. "Human outreach in the wake of these disasters has proven that the Internet is truly a community of communities, bringing together people and services to play critical roles in the process of recovery and rejuvenation."

The American Red Cross site, RedCross.org, saw 9.6 million visitors in September -- more than five times the amount of traffic it saw in August 2005 -- making it the highest-gaining property for the month. The second-highest gaining property was FEMA.gov, the Web home of the Federal Emergency Management Agency. FEMA had 4.9 million visitors in September 2005, a 369-percent increase from August traffic totals. Beyond major government and relief organization sites, many Americans visited smaller, "grassroots" sites to aid in hurricane relief. The highest-gaining category in terms of growth was religion, which climbed 10 percent to reach 14.9 million unique visitors in September. Religion sites became destinations for those looking to help others as well as themselves, as daily commentaries, audio broadcasts and e-greetings were popular destinations at these sites.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Fermi finds a 'transformer' pulsar

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

How rockstars and peacocks attract the ladies

7 minutes ago

What is it that makes rockstars so attractive to the opposite sex? Turns out Charles Darwin had it pegged hundreds of years ago – and it has a lot to do with peacocks.

Nine emerging trends in pet food

17 minutes ago

Four out of five pet owners now consider their pet a member of the family, and consumers are shifting their priorities when it comes to purchasing food for their pets accordingly (Mintel, Pet Food, 2013).

Vertical farms offer a bright future for hungry cities

37 minutes ago

The 21st century has seen rapid urbanisation and the global population is now expected to grow to more than 8.3 billion by 2050. Currently, 800m hectares – 38% of the earth's land surface – is farmed ...

Recommended for you

Fermi finds a 'transformer' pulsar

5 hours ago

(Phys.org) —In late June 2013, an exceptional binary containing a rapidly spinning neutron star underwent a dramatic change in behavior never before observed. The pulsar's radio beacon vanished, while at ...

New launch date set for ISS delivery vessel

6 hours ago

A robot ship will be launched from Kourou, French Guiana, after a five-day delay on July 29 to deliver provisions to the International Space Station, space transport firm Arianespace said Tuesday.

The heart of an astronaut, five years on

8 hours ago

The heart of an astronaut is a much-studied thing. Scientists have analyzed its blood flow, rhythms, atrophy and, through journal studies, even matters of the heart. But for the first time, researchers are ...

User comments : 0