No link to happiness and intelligence

Jul 16, 2005

A high level of intelligence does not correlate with happiness in childhood or old age, Scottish researchers found.

Edinburgh University researchers found more intelligent people get better life opportunities but also had higher expectations, according to the study published in the British Medical Journal.

The researchers examined 550 Scottish volunteers born in 1921, who had their IQs tested when they were age 11 and again at 80 years old, the BBC reported Friday.

"If you are 80 and healthy, then your satisfaction with how your life has turned out bears no relation to how you scored on an IQ test recently or 70 years ago," said Ian Deary of the University of Edinburgh.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: UC Santa Barbara receives $65M from Munger

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

New research reveals fish are smarter than we thought

15 hours ago

(Phys.org) —A new study from researchers in our Department of Psychology with colleagues at Queen Mary University of London has reported the first evidence that fish are able to process multiple objects ...

Scientist creates automatic birdsong recognition app

15 hours ago

Dr Dan Stowell, an EPSRC Research Fellow in QMUL's School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, has used a grant from Queen Mary Innovation to develop a prototype for an app that turns his research ...

Fighting the global water scarcity issue

15 hours ago

According to the World Water Management Institute, over one-third of the human population is affected by water scarcity. If nothing is done to prevent it, an estimated 1.8 billion people will be living in ...

Genes play a key part in the recipe for a happy country

14 hours ago

Why are the Danes naturally more cheerful than the Brits, and why are we in turn more upbeat than the French? Research presented as part of this year's ESRC Festival of Social Sciences shows us that the recipe behind a happy ...

Recommended for you

UC Santa Barbara receives $65M from Munger

10 hours ago

A physics institute at the University of California, Santa Barbara, has received a $65 million donation—the largest single gift in the university's history.

The economics of age gaps and marriage

15 hours ago

Men and women who are married to spouses of similar ages are smarter, more successful and more attractive compared to couples with larger age gaps, according to a paper from CU Denver Economics Assistant Professor Hani Mansour ...

Prophet's ancient seal provides insights from antiquity

16 hours ago

When a personal artifact of a religious leader is discovered nearly 1,700 years after its use, the object provides invaluable historical insights. Zsuzsanna Gulacsi, professor of Comparative Cultural Studies, ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.