Mexico, US, Canada to work on Monarch butterflies

February 20, 2014

Mexico, the United States and Canada have agreed to form a working group on the conservation of Monarch butterflies, whose numbers fell to record lows this year at their wintering grounds in central Mexico.

Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto announced the decision Wednesday at the end of a one-day summit with U.S. President Barack Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper.

Experts say the butterflies' annual migration from the United States and Canada is in danger because of extreme weather, habitat loss due to deforestation and the displacement of milkweed, the Monarchs' main food source.

Pena Nieto did not announce any specific measures.

The World Wildlife Fund in Mexico called the announcement an important step, but said concrete measures are needed to protect the butterflies' habitat.

Explore further: Butterflies make partial comeback in Mexico

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