Sea otter that survived '89 spill dies in Seattle

May 28, 2010

(AP) -- A 21-year-old northern sea otter who survived the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaska died Thursday at the Seattle Aquarium.

Nuka had lived at the since 2001 after spending the earlier part of her life at a Chicago aquarium.

Aquarium officials say Nuka was considered geriatric and her health had been declining over the past several months. Aquarium staff and mammal biologists and her veterinarian decided the time had come to euthanize her.

Nuka was the oldest of the aquarium's otters.

Explore further: Briefs: BellSouth provides aquarium network

0 shares

Related Stories

Aquarium to debut rare baby penguins

January 6, 2006

Two baby gentoo penguins, about the size of softballs, were to make their debut Thursday at the Newport Aquarium, The Cincinnati Enquirer reports.

Rare coral sold for fish tanks

January 19, 2008

British customs officials say the rising popularity of home reef aquariums is boosting an illegal trade in endangered live coral from around the world.

Recommended for you

Researchers design first artificial ribosome

July 29, 2015

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago and Northwestern University have engineered a tethered ribosome that works nearly as well as the authentic cellular component, or organelle, that produces all the proteins ...

Studies reveal details of error correction in cell division

July 29, 2015

Cell biologists led by Thomas Maresca at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, with collaborators elsewhere, report an advance in understanding the workings of an error correction mechanism that helps cells detect and ...

Researchers discover new type of mycovirus

July 29, 2015

Researchers, led by Dr Robert Coutts, Leverhulme Research Fellow from the School of Life and Medical Sciences at the University of Hertfordshire, and Dr Ioly Kotta-Loizou, Research Associate at Imperial College, have discovered ...

Stressed out plants send animal-like signals

July 29, 2015

University of Adelaide research has shown for the first time that, despite not having a nervous system, plants use signals normally associated with animals when they encounter stress.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.