Ford plans five electric cars, wants technology to improve

Sep 30, 2010
US auto giant Ford Motor said it was on track to deliver five electric cars in Europe over the next five years but warned the technology needed to improve dramatically for the market to expand.

US auto giant Ford Motor said it was on track to deliver five electric cars in Europe over the next five years but warned the technology needed to improve dramatically for the market to expand.

"We've got the capability to proliferate further if we think the demand is there," Stephen Odell, chairman and CEO of Ford Europe, told AFP at the Paris Motor Show.

But he said that he believed that even 10 years from now, most cars would still be running on diesel or petrol engines.

"Frankly the technology needs to get better, with a longer range ... and the cost has got to come down. And there's the -- where are you going to charge your car?" he asked.

"If it takes 14 or 15 hours to charge your car that means you can't use it every day," said Odell, whose company was presenting the new Ford Focus range at the Paris show.

Range is another issue, he said.

"The maximum range you can get on most at the moment is probably about 100 kilometres (62 miles), which sort of restricts you to your journey to and from work," said Odell.

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James007E
1 / 5 (1) Sep 30, 2010
To design a Truck Battery, You do not think small like the Electric Vehecle. That do for small Electric Vehecle, I saw my self. Need bigger and Faster Truck Elecrical big Vehecle. That goes long time, like 500 hour charge.
BuddyEbsen
3 / 5 (2) Sep 30, 2010
"The maximum range you can get on most electric vehicles at the moment is probably about 100 kilometres (62 miles), which sort of restricts you to your journey to and from work," said Odell.

As opposed to driving all the way across the country every day, which is what most people do?
bhiestand
3 / 5 (2) Oct 01, 2010
There have been some pretty interesting prototypes of towable generators, and similar innovative ways of expanding the range of electric vehicles.

Personally, I think most people would be very happy with either a two-car solution (owning or renting for long-distance trips) or a plugin-hybrid. The average urban commuter probably doesn't need to get more than 60 miles out of a single charge. Additionally, higher-voltage charging systems already seem to exist.
Quantum_Conundrum
not rated yet Oct 02, 2010
The average commute to work is still 26 miles each way in Louisiana, which comes to 52 miles round trip. then you have to figure shopping trip, and you have no energy remaining to do anything else. Nevermind normal life like visiting friends, dating, going to a movie or sports game, etc.

Then as stated, it takes 14+ hours to charge the thing, which leaves it not even fully charged the next day.

A possible alternative would be if employers provided a means to charge the vehicle some while you were at work, and you would pay them for the charge. Unfortunately, this would put employees even more at the mercy of their employers, who would no doubt charge above cost for the service, like everything else.