Five workplace trends will shape life after lockdown

We are experiencing the biggest remote work experiment in history—but many are beginning to imagine life after lockdown. Amid unprecedented global job losses, concerns about transport infrastructure and the continuing need ...

Study finds bike lanes provide positive economic impact

Despite longstanding popular belief, bicycle lanes can actually improve business. At worst, the negative impact on sales and employment is minimal, according to a new study from Portland State's Transportation Research and ...

Experts warn Australia at risk from drought, rising water levels

Leading water and coastal engineering experts from the University of Western Australia warn one of the biggest risks facing Australia is water security, with some regional towns experiencing water shortage to the point where ...

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Infrastructure

Infrastructure can be defined as the basic physical and organizational structures needed for the operation of a society or enterprise, or the services and facilities necessary for an economy to function. The term typically refers to the technical structures that support a society, such as roads, water supply, sewers, power grids, telecommunications, and so forth. Viewed functionally, infrastructure facilitates the production of goods and services; for example, roads enable the transport of raw materials to a factory, and also for the distribution of finished products to markets. In some contexts, the term may also include basic social services such as schools and hospitals . In military parlance, the term refers to the buildings and permanent installations necessary for the support, redeployment, and operation of military forces .

In this article, infrastructure will be used in the sense of technical structures or physical networks that support society, unless specified otherwise.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA