Improving prepayment electricity schemes could benefit households

July 21, 2014
Improving prepayment electricity schemes could benefit households

As power prices continue in an upward trend as reported in the latest Consumer Price Index, a new study shows households looking to find ways to make savings could benefit from using prepayment metering.

Just published in the international journal Sustainable Cities and Society, the University of Otago, Wellington study describes in-depth interviews with 12 households in the lower North Island.

Households reported a high level of satisfaction with using prepayment metering for , despite the higher prices charged in New Zealand for the service.

The study was undertaken by Dr Kimberley O'Sullivan, Helen Viggers, and Professor Philippa Howden-Chapman of the He Kainga Oranga/Housing and Health Research Programme. It found households using prepayment metering benefit from more immediate feedback on their electricity use and find it easier to budget.

Households used their prepayment meters to put a price on using different electrical appliances such as heaters, ovens, and clothes driers. This allowed them to make more informed choices about how they budget their electricity use within the home.

However, Dr O'Sullivan cautions that fairer pricing for prepayment and better consumer protections are required to level the playing field.

"I would like to see the Government step up and follow the example of Northern Ireland, where prepayment meter prices are required to be less expensive than standard billing, and stronger consumer protections around crediting and disconnection are in place," Dr O'Sullivan says.

Previous nationwide surveys carried out by He Kainga Oranga have found that mostly low-income households use prepayment. It is unfair that these households have to pay more for their electricity despite paying in advance and having no risk of debt-accrual to companies, Dr O'Sullivan says.

Competition in the prepayment market is also decreasing, with Contact Energy no longer accepting new prepayment customers, and only one retailer offering prepayment in most areas where it is available.

Prepayment metering could have significant advantages for managing household energy consumption from an environmental perspective, Dr O'Sullivan says.

"Better feedback about the cost of using electricity within the home can help to encourage energy efficiency. That's good for budgets and the environment where there is room for people to make savings. For some who are not using enough electricity to keep warm though, there is a risk that they will be put off using heating and go cold."

Explore further: Zimbabwe to hand out 5 mln energy-saving bulbs

More information: The study is available online: authors.elsevier.com/a/1PMHa7sfVYa5E6

Related Stories

Zimbabwe to hand out 5 mln energy-saving bulbs

August 15, 2011

Zimbabwe's electricity authority is to hand out 5.5 million energy-saving flourescent bulbs to its consumers in a bid to curb consumption, a state daily newspaper reported Monday.

'Energy poverty' a growing problem

August 20, 2012

(Phys.org) -- Low-income households in Australia are increasingly at risk of "energy poverty", a situation in which a household must spend more than 10 percent of its disposable income on energy bills, according to a paper ...

Monitoring neighbourhood electricity consumption

July 4, 2014

With more and more households owning one or even two electric cars requiring charging overnight, how will we manage without sacrificing our hot morning shower and fresh bread for breakfast?

Taking charge in electricity research

July 7, 2014

Dr Rebecca Ford, from the School of Engineering and Computer Science, is part of a nationwide research team exploring the future of electricity supply and consumption in New Zealand.

Recommended for you

Netherlands bank customers can get vocal on payments

August 1, 2015

Are some people fed up with remembering and using passwords and PINs to make it though the day? Those who have had enough would prefer to do without them. For mobile tasks that involve banking, though, it is obvious that ...

Power grid forecasting tool reduces costly errors

July 30, 2015

Accurately forecasting future electricity needs is tricky, with sudden weather changes and other variables impacting projections minute by minute. Errors can have grave repercussions, from blackouts to high market costs. ...

Microsoft describes hard-to-mimic authentication gesture

August 1, 2015

Photos. Messages. Bank account codes. And so much more—sit on a person's mobile device, and the question is, how to secure them without having to depend on lengthy password codes of letters and numbers. Vendors promoting ...

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

hangman04
not rated yet Jul 22, 2014
as long as we, the consumers, will not be able to choose between several electricity distributors, and we are captive between the lobbying of big companies and the institutions that watch over them, ensuring they don't do whatever they want with the final cost, this all will be a scam.

gladly in some parts of the world people are starting to use newables to substitute the grid, but even so, only a few can afford such investments, and moreover it's just a matter of time till the governments will try to tax or ban this practice in the name of saving the current grid system!

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.