Related topics: energy · solar energy · power · megawatts · renewable energy

China may miss all key climate targets for 2025: report

China may miss all of its main climate goals for 2025, a new report showed Thursday, as the world's largest emitter increased its reliance on carbon-intensive industries to bolster a flagging economy.

Exploring microstructures for high-performance materials

In just the first few months of 2024, the journal Nature has published two scientific papers co-authored by Kun Luo, an Iowa State University postdoctoral research associate in materials science and engineering.

14 parameters in one go: New instrument for optoelectronics

An HZB physicist has developed a new method for the comprehensive characterization of semiconductors in a single measurement. The "Constant Light-Induced Magneto-Transport (CLIMAT)" is based on the Hall effect and allows ...

Altermagnetism experimentally demonstrated

Ferromagnetism and antiferromagnetism have long been known to scientists as two classes of magnetic order of materials. Back in 2019, researchers at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) postulated a third class of magnetism, ...

Research analyzes energy poverty in La Cañada Real, Spain

About 4,000 people in Madrid, almost half of the inhabitants of La Cañada Real, have experienced extreme energy poverty. That is one of the conclusions of a study by researchers at the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) ...

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Electricity

Electricity (from the New Latin ēlectricus, "amber-like"[a]) is a general term that encompasses a variety of phenomena resulting from the presence and flow of electric charge. These include many easily recognizable phenomena, such as lightning and static electricity, but in addition, less familiar concepts, such as the electromagnetic field and electromagnetic induction.

In general usage, the word 'electricity' is adequate to refer to a number of physical effects. However, in scientific usage, the term is vague, and these related, but distinct, concepts are better identified by more precise terms:

Electrical phenomena have been studied since antiquity, though advances in the science were not made until the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Practical applications for electricity however remained few, and it would not be until the late nineteenth century that engineers were able to put it to industrial and residential use. The rapid expansion in electrical technology at this time transformed industry and society. Electricity's extraordinary versatility as a source of energy means it can be put to an almost limitless set of applications which include transport, heating, lighting, communications, and computation. The backbone of modern industrial society is, and for the foreseeable future can be expected to remain, the use of electrical power.

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