Related topics: energy · solar energy · power · megawatts · renewable energy

How light can a foldable and long-lasting battery be?

With the launch of wearable devices and smartphones that require a high capacity of electricity such as foldable phones and 5G phones, the interest in batteries is increasing and various battery types are under development. ...

Image: Holiday Kristall

This box of holiday cheer is actually tubes of plasma containing suspended microparticles exposed to an electrical current to form 3-D crystal structures.

Lithium can now be recycled

Lithium from Norwegian electric car batteries isn't recycled that often. Instead, it ends up as waste when other metals it's mixed with are recycled. But this may change.

Bayer targets climate-neutral business by 2030

German chemical and pharmaceutical giant Bayer said Tuesday it aims to become "climate-neutral" by 2030, slashing or compensating all of its greenhouse gas emissions.

Green hydrogen: Research to enhance efficiency

Laboratory experiments and a parabolic flight campaign have enabled an international team of researchers from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) to gain new insights into water electrolysis, in which hydrogen ...

Nanowire detects Abrikosov vortices

Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Lomonosov Moscow State University, and the Institute of Solid State Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences have demonstrated the possibility of detecting ...

How planets may form after dust sticks together

Scientists may have figured out how dust particles can stick together to form planets, according to a Rutgers co-authored study that may also help to improve industrial processes.

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Electricity

Electricity (from the New Latin ēlectricus, "amber-like"[a]) is a general term that encompasses a variety of phenomena resulting from the presence and flow of electric charge. These include many easily recognizable phenomena, such as lightning and static electricity, but in addition, less familiar concepts, such as the electromagnetic field and electromagnetic induction.

In general usage, the word 'electricity' is adequate to refer to a number of physical effects. However, in scientific usage, the term is vague, and these related, but distinct, concepts are better identified by more precise terms:

Electrical phenomena have been studied since antiquity, though advances in the science were not made until the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Practical applications for electricity however remained few, and it would not be until the late nineteenth century that engineers were able to put it to industrial and residential use. The rapid expansion in electrical technology at this time transformed industry and society. Electricity's extraordinary versatility as a source of energy means it can be put to an almost limitless set of applications which include transport, heating, lighting, communications, and computation. The backbone of modern industrial society is, and for the foreseeable future can be expected to remain, the use of electrical power.

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