The world's favorite fruit only better-tasting and longer-lasting

May 23, 2013

Tomatoes, said to be the world's most popular fruit, can be made both better-tasting and longer-lasting thanks to UK research with purple GM varieties.

"Working with GM that are different to normal fruit only by the addition of a specific compound, allows us to pinpoint exactly how to breed in valuable traits," said Professor Cathie Martin from the John Innes Centre.

The research could also lead to GM varieties with better flavour, health and shelf life characteristics because even higher levels of the compounds can be achieved.

In research to be published in Current Biology, Martin and colleagues studied tomatoes enriched in anthocyanin, a natural pigment that confers high . The purple GM tomatoes have already been found to prolong the lives of cancer-prone mice and in the latest findings they also more double the normal shelf life of tomatoes from an average of 21 days to 48 days.

"Post-harvest losses due to rotting are such a serious problem for growers and supermarkets that even an increased shelf life of one day would make an enormous difference to them," said Yang Zhang, lead author from the John Innes Centre.

One way to improve shelf life is to pick tomatoes early when they are still green and induce them to ripen artificially with . However, this results in loss of flavour. Another method is to grow varieties that never fully ripen, but these also never develop a full flavour.

In the current study, were found to slow down the over-ripening process that leads to rotting and softening, achieving a tomato with a long shelf life and full flavour. The purple tomatoes were also less susceptible to one of the most important postharvest diseases, grey mould caused by Botrytis cinerea.

Conventional tomatoes can now be screened for their antioxidant capacity. Those found to be highest in can be used as parental lines for breeding.

"Our research has identified a new target for breeders to produce tomato varieties that are fuller in flavour, and so more appealing to consumers, and more valuable commercially due to increased ," said Martin.

The findings could also be applied to other soft fruit such as strawberries and raspberries.

Other varieties of JIC tomatoes high in a variety of compounds such as those found in red wine are being used by Essex company Biodeb to develop a range of skincare products.

Explore further: Bioengineering study finds two-cell mouse embryos already talking about their future

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Kev_C
not rated yet May 24, 2013
We don't need any GM Tomato that tastes sweet or otherwise. We already have dozens of natural non GM varieties that do that so stop meddling in something that does not concern humanity and focus on the things that do like climate change. And no that does not mean developing anything remotely genetically modified to combat climate change either before you ask.
Iochroma
not rated yet Jun 04, 2013
I agree that we do not need GM tomatoes at this point. In fact, breeders at Oregon State U. have produced high-anthocyanin tomatoes with traditional breeding techniques from natural species that had that trait. Amateur breeders around the world are now working with these to bring the "blue" trait forward. This research with the GM variety (which has never been released to the wider world) points to a valuable feature that the high-anthocyanin trait may infer. Anti-GMO rants do nothing to illuminate.
ValeriaT
1 / 5 (3) Jun 04, 2013
BTW Could be GMO linked to autism)? This is indeed not easy to say - but just because of it this link should be checked seriously at the peer-reviewed scientific level - i.e. not ignored, as usually. At any case, the multiple sclerosis is a typical autoimmune disease and its link to autism was proven recently. Also, about 70% of children diagnosed with autism are found to have digestive disorders. Symptoms include inflammation, intestinal permeability, and imbalances in the intestinal flora. These same symptoms also appear in animals fed GMO feed, for example at the case of honeybees larvae, who were fed with GMO pollens.

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