Current Biology is a scientific journal that covers all areas of biology, especially molecular biology, cell biology, genetics, neurobiology, ecology and evolutionary biology. The journal is published twice a month and includes peer-reviewed research articles, various types of review articles, as well as an editorial magazine section. Current Biology was founded in 1991 by the Current Science group, acquired by Elsevier in 1998 and has since 2001 been part of Cell Press, a subdivision of Elsevier.

Publisher
Cell Press
Country
United States
History
1991–present
Website
http://www.current-biology.com/
Impact factor
10.777 (2008)

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Risk aversion as a survival strategy in ants

Ants are excellent navigators and always find their way back to the nest. But how do they react when an obstacle or a predator blocks their path?

How do mantis shrimp find their way home?

Mantis shrimps have earned fame for their powerful punching limbs, incredibly unusual eyes, and vivid exoskeletons. And, it turns out, they're also really good at finding their way home. Through a series of painstaking experiments ...

Scientists discover a new class of taste receptors

Evolution is a tinkerer, not an engineer. "Evolution does not produce novelties from scratch. It works with what already exists," wrote Nobel laureate François Jacob in 1977, and biologists continue to find this to be true.

Genetic self-activation maintains plant stem cells

Branching allows plants to occupy space in three dimensions, an innovation considered essential for their adaption. Stem cells are key to this process because they promote the establishment of new growth axes. But where do ...

Starlings sleep less during summer and full-moon nights

Researchers of the University of Groningen and the Max Planck Institute have found that starlings sleep five hours less per night during the summer. Compared to winter, the birds take more mid-day naps and live under higher ...

Scientists learn how vampire bat strangers make friends

We humans can explain how our relationships with college roommates and co-workers have formed over the years, but scientists haven't had a good grip on how friendly connections among strangers are made between animals—until ...

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