Lithium-ion battery is fast-charged in minutes

Aug 17, 2012 by Nancy Owano report
Lithium-ion battery is fast-charged in minutes

(Phys.org) -- A lithium-ion battery that can charge 120 times faster than normal is reportedly the work of scientists from Korea at the Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) The scientists lay claim to a technology that enables a recharge 30 to 120 times faster than conventional li-ion batteries, according to the Korean news agency, Yonhap.

The scientists in believe their process will cut the time down to a matter of minutes—tackling head-on a key issue with rechargeable batteries, the time they take to recharge. Their method makes use of cathode material, standard lithium manganese oxide (LMO), soaked in a solution containing graphite.

By carbonizing the graphite-soaked LMO, the graphite turns into a network of conductive traces that run throughout the cathode. These carbonized graphite networks allow all parts of the to recharge at the same time. Therein lies the speed-up. The cathode is packaged with an electrolyte and graphite anode to create the fast-charging battery.

The key feature is that all energy-holding particles of the new battery start recharging simultaneously, in contrast to what takes place in conventional batteries, with the same particles recharging in order from the outermost particles to the innermost.

Their work has been praised in its implications for hoped-for EV adoptions. “The development of such a battery could significantly raise the popularity of electric vehicles whose lithium-ion batteries currently take hours to recharge,” according to the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology.

Although electric vehicles promise more efficiency than gasoline and diesel-powered cars, the idea of spending two hours recharging a has been seen as an inconvenience, and the time factor claimed by the scientists will obviously be seen with interest.

All the same, cost will remain another barrier. According to observers, the time convenience does not address the pricetag inconvenience. Li-ion battery packs are expensive; the carbonized LMO battery developed by the researchers is not expected to carry a much lower price than what is available now.

The researchers’ paper, “Carbon-Coated Single-Crystal LiMn2O4 Nanoparticle Clusters as Cathode Material for High-Energy and High-Power Lithium-Ion Batteries,” was published earlier this month in Angewandte Chemie. Authors are Sanghan Lee, Yonghyun Cho, Prof. Hyun-Kon Song, Prof. Kyu Tae Lee, and Prof. Jaephil Cho. The researchers were supported by the Converging Research Center Program through the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology.

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More information: DOI: 10.1002/ange.201203581

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wealthychef
Aug 17, 2012
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
jimbo92107
1 / 5 (1) Aug 17, 2012
While we wait for car-sized batteries, it would be nice to recharge my hedge trimmer in under 8 hours.
joefarah
3.7 / 5 (6) Aug 17, 2012
COST!!! This is definitely lower cost for EVs. Why? Take the current EVs that get 150 to 200 Km/charge (95-125 Mi/charge) that takes 6 hrs to charge. Take off half of the batteries and I have a better car - 75-100km/charge (45-60 Mi/charge) - but I only have to wait 5 to 10 min. to charge it. I can make a long trip faster, and it's still good for short trips. MUCH BETTER CAR. HALF THE BATTERY COST!
joefarah
1 / 5 (2) Aug 17, 2012
OK - rethink this... these need special High Current charging stations. So only if the infrastructure is there... and this requires fast charge stations with ~1000 amp chargers.
ValeriaT
1 / 5 (2) Aug 17, 2012
Lithium-ion battery is fast-charged in minutes
Such a batteries are anounced every year. Their durability is low and they're way less stable. BTW it's not even simple to speed-up the charging of electromobiles with respect to the grid capacity (currents over 50 Amperes).
javjav
not rated yet Aug 17, 2012
No need to wait for this technology. Want to recharge 5 times faster? Just put 5 small batteries rather than a big one, and charge the 5 at the same time. The high current need is the same for both cases. And it has the advantage that you could carry one of the small batteries by hand anywhere in case of emergency, or if no charge station is available near the car.
NotParker
1 / 5 (5) Aug 17, 2012
How many cars will burn using this technology versus current car torching batteries?
trekgeek1
1 / 5 (1) Aug 17, 2012
OK - rethink this... these need special High Current charging stations. So only if the infrastructure is there... and this requires fast charge stations with ~1000 amp chargers.


They'd probably need to have a trickle charge system in place that charges up ultracapacitors at each "pump". Then when you drive up to the station they would have some indicator of how long is left until the pump is ready. Or perhaps how much energy is available in the caps, because some cars need more energy than others and a full capacitor bank could charge one large vehicle or many small vehicles. If you have people lined up waiting then you are out of luck still.
trekgeek1
1 / 5 (1) Aug 17, 2012
Actually, the more I think about it, a lead-acid battery would probably be better. The capacitors leak and therefore are undesirable for applications where you are not sure how long you need to store energy before it is used. If you are going to slowly charge an energy storage bank, you may just use a bank of batteries which then charge your car's battery and don't put such a load on the grid.
italba
1 / 5 (3) Aug 17, 2012
Let's take, for instance, the new Ford Focus electric. She has a 23 kWh battery, you can recharge it with, let's say, 30 kWh. With 220 V you'll need 3 to 4 hours. If these new batteries could be recharged 60 times faster, you'll have to connect your car 3 to 4 minutes to a 600 kW socket, probably 380 V three-phases. Quite a big current for a home, but absolutely normal for a small industrial plant. Those talking about thousands of Amperes are just spreading FUD, as normally happens with every article about electric car or batteries. I hope they are, at least, well payed for this.
jshloram
1 / 5 (1) Aug 17, 2012
Charging is rarely close to 100% efficient. The remaining energy goes off as heat. Speed of charging is often limited by dissipation of that heat.
kochevnik
3 / 5 (4) Aug 17, 2012
I'm off lithium now until my Russian Jew battery man tells me otherwise.
Newbeak
1 / 5 (1) Aug 17, 2012
Actually, the more I think about it, a lead-acid battery would probably be better. The capacitors leak and therefore are undesirable for applications where you are not sure how long you need to store energy before it is used. If you are going to slowly charge an energy storage bank, you may just use a bank of batteries which then charge your car's battery and don't put such a load on the grid.

You could use flywheel storage instead of batteries.Unlimited recharge cycles,and I've heard existing ones are quite efficient at holding a "charge".
dub1
1.5 / 5 (2) Aug 18, 2012
If they can simultaneousely charge all internal components, that would lessen the heat problem. Heat is generally wasted at a point. A billion dollar battery is for all intents and purposes, useless.
jerryd
1 / 5 (1) Aug 20, 2012

Many batteries from lead, to lithium already charge in 15 minutes, at least the ones designed for it like all lead and lithiums like A123's, Kokam,etc.

EV battery charging is limited by the chargers, not the battery. Putting 15kw into a battery in 15 minutes means you have to pump in 61 or so Kw's.

Most batteries are extremely eff both charging and discharging 95% plus.

So while this might be a small improvement, it's hype, lies makes me wonder.
Newbeak
1 / 5 (1) Aug 20, 2012

Many batteries from lead, to lithium already charge in 15 minutes, at least the ones designed for it like all lead and lithiums like A123's, Kokam,etc.

So you could have charging stations equipped with flywheels that could dump hundreds of amps into a battery,and then be slowly recharged from the grid for the next vehicle.
NotParker
1 / 5 (3) Aug 20, 2012

Many batteries from lead, to lithium already charge in 15 minutes, at least the ones designed for it like all lead and lithiums like A123's, Kokam,etc.

So you could have charging stations equipped with flywheels that could dump hundreds of amps into a battery,and then be slowly recharged from the grid for the next vehicle.


"Beacon Power's spinning flywheels, which are made of carbon fiber and levitated in a vacuum by magnets, absorb energy from the grid and discharge 1 megawatt for as much as 15 minutes."

http://news.cnet....ag=river

Notice how massive the installation is. For 15 minutes. Useful for evening out power on the grid, but 15 minutes?

Not useful for storing wind energy.

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