Solar power system that works at night a renewable energy game-changer

solar power
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An innovative thermal battery being developed by Curtin University researchers will be key to a solar power system capable of producing electricity overnight, rivaling fossil fuels as a viable source of power for commercial and heavy industries around the world, including mining operations.

Curtin is collaborating with international renewable energy companies United Sun Systems and ITP Thermal on the potentially game-changing project, which is being led by Professor Craig Buckley from Curtin's School of Electrical Engineering, Computing and Mathematical Sciences.

Professor Craig Buckley said the thermal battery was part of the Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) system being developed by United Sun Systems, which requires a battery to store and release energy to enable non-stop generation.

"Storage has long been a stumbling point for renewable energy but our prototype thermal battery is able to store and, as required, release without reliance on sunlight at all times," Professor Buckley said.

"The battery uses a high-temperature metal hydride or metal carbonate as the heat storage medium and a low temperature gas storage vessel for storing the hydrogen or carbon dioxide.

"At night, and in times of cloud cover, hydrogen or is released from the gas storage vessel and absorbed by the higher temperature metal to form a metal hydride/metal carbonate, which produces heat used to generate electricity."

Curtin University Deputy Vice-Chancellor Research Professor Chris Moran said the project aimed to develop a that produced electricity 24 hours a day, seven days a week and was commercially viable for industry.

"As with the lithium battery systems that Curtin is also developing, the deployment of a cost-effective energy storage system using thermal batteries will revolutionize the landscape of production world-wide by allowing renewables to truly compete with ," Professor Moran said.

"While a lithium battery stores electrical energy that can be used to provide electricity when the sun is not shining, this thermal battery stores heat from concentrated solar thermal, which can be used when the sun is not shining to run a turbine to produce electricity."

The research aims to develop new technology to integrate thermochemical energy storage via a into a dish-Stirling system.

A dish-Stirling system can provide up to 46 kW of power and is ideal for powering remote energy intensive industries such as mine sites due to it providing power on demand and as required. Several dishes can be deployed depending on the power requirements of the site.


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Citation: Solar power system that works at night a renewable energy game-changer (2019, July 11) retrieved 22 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-07-solar-power-night-renewable-energy.html
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Jul 11, 2019
Here is another way energy storage could work.
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MIT's conceptual "sun-in-a-box" energy storage system plugs into molten silicon

there are a few problems with salt as a storage medium – for one, it becomes quite corrosive when the heat is cranked up.
"Salt tops out at about 1,000° F (538° C), after which its damaging effects become too problematic. So the MIT team looked for a new material that could store more heat, which in turn raises the energy density of the system. They eventually settled on silicon, which can be heated to over 4,000° F (2,200° C) and is abundant to boot."

https://newatlas....m/57562/
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It seems to me that CSP or solar thermal plants could also use silicon for heat storage, greatly increasing their efficiency, power output and lower costs.


Jul 11, 2019
Well, frflyer, 4000F is pretty corrosive in and of itself. Whatcha gonna store it in?

Jul 11, 2019
Here's one way to do it? Solar energy reserves obtained at longitude X degrees should be stored at longitude X+10 degrees east (10 degrees east, 5 degrees east, 1 degree east, whatever is practicable). Then, my lights will work in the dark here because folks to my west where the sun is shining are charging my batteries. What goes around comes around. The Earth is ALWAYS bathed in solar energy. So distribute it eastward As the World Turns.

Jul 12, 2019
"Well, frflyer, 4000F is pretty corrosive in and of itself. Whatcha gonna store it in?"

MIT's conceptual "sun-in-a-box" energy storage system plugs into molten silicon

there are a few problems with salt as a storage medium – for one, it becomes quite corrosive when the heat is cranked up.

"Salt tops out at about 1,000° F (538° C), after which its damaging effects become too problematic. So the MIT team looked for a new material that could store more heat, which in turn raises the energy density of the system. They eventually settled on silicon, which can be heated to over 4,000° F (2,200° C) and is abundant to boot."

https://newatlas....m/57562/

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Jul 12, 2019
And here's your answer

"One of the issues that the team foresaw is that the molten silicon might react with and corrode the graphite tank, so to test it out, the researchers built a mini tank. When it was filled with silicon heated to 3,600° F (1,980° C) for an hour, they found it did react with the graphite to form silicon carbide. But rather than damaging the tank, this actually created a thin protective layer, the researchers say."

Jul 14, 2019
Here's one way to do it? Solar energy reserves obtained at longitude X degrees should be stored at longitude X+10 degrees east (10 degrees east, 5 degrees east, 1 degree east, whatever is practicable). Then, my lights will work in the dark here because folks to my west where the sun is shining are charging my batteries. What goes around comes around. The Earth is ALWAYS bathed in solar energy. So distribute it eastward As the World Turns.

Brilliant.
But, I guess no one told you. The sun rises in the east. /sarc

Jul 14, 2019
@tehalgore hates solar energy.

Jul 14, 2019
Da Schitts, the knob gobbler, loves swallowing his butt buddy's meat.

Jul 14, 2019
Here's one way to do it? Solar energy reserves obtained at longitude X degrees should be stored at longitude X+10 degrees east (10 degrees east, 5 degrees east, 1 degree east, whatever is practicable). Then, my lights will work in the dark here because folks to my west where the sun is shining are charging my batteries. What goes around comes around. The Earth is ALWAYS bathed in solar energy. So distribute it eastward As the World Turns.

Brilliant.
But, I guess no one told you. The sun rises in the east. /sarc

... as does the darkness that follows after the sun moves westward.

Jul 14, 2019
Gee, @tehalgore, sounds like you're teh @geighalgore. You know so much about gay sex acts.

Are you trying to come out?

Jul 14, 2019
Poor Da Schitts, the knob gobbler. His butt buddy dumped him after he saw how much shit he was pulling out of his ass, to soil the forum. Now he trolls the internet, in his desperate search for man meat.

LMAO.
Good luck.

Jul 15, 2019
And here's your answer

"One of the issues that the team foresaw is that the molten silicon might react with and corrode the graphite tank, so to test it out, the researchers built a mini tank. When it was filled with silicon heated to 3,600° F (1,980° C) for an hour, they found it did react with the graphite to form silicon carbide. But rather than damaging the tank, this actually created a thin protective layer, the researchers say."

Cool!

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