Nuclear plant shuts down unexpectedly in Washington state

May 18, 2018

A nuclear power plant in southeastern Washington shut down unexpectedly Friday.

The Tri-City Herald reports the Columbia Generating Station's systems detected a problem having to do with electrical distribution and automatically shut the plant down at 6:51 a.m.

Authorities said there is no risk to the public.

The 1,207-megawatt plant is the only commercially operated nuclear power plant in the Pacific Northwest and produces enough electricity to power a city the size of Seattle.

Plant officials are investigating the issue, which involved the main transformer and the system, John Dobken said, spokesman for Energy Northwest.

The exact cause was not known.

"The plant responded as designed" and is stable, Dobken said.

The plant last had an unexpected shutdown in August after an air removal valve in the plant's turbine building closed.

Bonneville Power Administration, which distributes electricity from the , "is well positioned to respond to the loss of generation," BPA spokesman Kevin Wingert said. "We are taking steps to ensure no impact to customers."

The is located about 10 miles (16 kilometers) north of Richland, Washington.

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5 comments

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WillieWard
5 / 5 (1) May 18, 2018
Solar plants are much more predictable, they shut down every night, or on cloudy/snowy/not-windy days, giving place to coal/gas-fired backup plants to prevent people from freezing in the dark.
Parsec
5 / 5 (3) May 18, 2018
Solar plants are much more predictable, they shut down every night, or on cloudy/snowy/not-windy days, giving place to coal/gas-fired backup plants to prevent people from freezing in the dark.


I am assuming there is a point in all that word salad?
rrwillsj
3 / 5 (4) May 20, 2018
But golly, Professor Science! You promised that nuclear power plants can operate 24/7 without fail. And with only the most stringent of safety standards.

{chuckle wheeze, stroke out laughing so hard}

Sorry but saying that crap with a straight face? Just breaks me up!
antialias_physorg
3.7 / 5 (3) May 20, 2018
Sooo...nuclear powerplants need backup from...erm...nuclear powerplants?
Gigel
5 / 5 (1) May 21, 2018
Solar plants are much more predictable, they shut down every night, or on cloudy/snowy/not-windy days, giving place to coal/gas-fired backup plants to prevent people from freezing in the dark.

And smoke from coal burners is really lovely. Lotsa lotsa radioactive elements being spewed into free air, for everyone to breathe.

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