Energy firms back investment into diesel engine

The Oil and Gas Climate Initiative (OGCI), which includes BP, Saudi Aramco, Royal Dutch Shell and Total and has a $1-billion inv
The Oil and Gas Climate Initiative (OGCI), which includes BP, Saudi Aramco, Royal Dutch Shell and Total and has a $1-billion investment fund for low-carbon technologies, said it was putting money into Achates Power

As major carmakers shift towards electric vehicles, a group of major oil and gas firms announced Friday an investment into a diesel engine.

The Oil and Gas Climate Initiative (OGCI), which includes BP, Saudi Aramco, Royal Dutch Shell and Total and has a $1-billion investment fund for low-carbon technologies, said it was putting money into Achates Power.

The US company promotes a high-efficiency combustion engine that it says increases fuel efficiency while reducing greenhouse gasses emitted by vehicles at an affordable cost to consumers.

"Pure electric vehicles and their fuel cell powered counterparts are unaffordable to the average car buyer; as such, they will remain a market novelty," Achates Power says on its website.

Diesel engines have under renewed attack after Volkswagen admitted in 2015 that millions of its diesel vehicles had been equipped with software that helped them cheat emissions tests and spew high levels of noxious fumes into the air.

A number of cities, including Paris, are looking to restrict diesels, while France and Britain plan to ban the sale of both petrol and cars by 2040. China, the world's largest car market, is considering following suit.

While the cost and limited range of mean they currently enjoy a narrow market share, most major car manufacturers have launched initiatives to develop a range of electric models and expect prices to drop as production volumes rise.

The OGCI also announced it would invest in a project to design a full-scale natural gas power plant that aims to capture and store , one of the products of burning fuel that causes global warming.

Another investment is into Solidia Technologies, a US-based cement and concrete production company that uses carbon dioxide instead of water in curing cement. The OGCI said the technology "has the potential to lower emissions in concrete production by up to 70 percent and water consumption by up to 80 percent".

The amount of the three investments was not disclosed.

The ten companies in the OGCI account for nearly one-fifth of global hydrocarbon production and supply around 10 percent of the planet's energy.

The group also includes China's CNPC, India's Reliance Industries, Italy's ENI, Mexico's Pemex, Norway's Statoil, and Spain's Repsol.


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Oct 28, 2017
Why not? But something tells me the cars using that engine will be as expensive if not more than EVs. What the point then?

Oct 28, 2017
Did you notice its the globally "giant oil companies" that are funding this initiative to continue burning gasoline/diesel in cars rather than convert to electricity? New innovative battery technologies are starting to come out of the world's labs and will blow fossil fuels away before they know what hit them. They talk down electric vehicles as is they're a joke to be pointed out for ridicule. They need to look in the mirror and see how foolish they look. Have you ever driven a Tesla? I drove a Tesla Model S a year ago and I can't wait until the market opens up and more hit the road so prices start becoming more affordable. It's the highest acceleration I've ever experienced, ever! And, no CO2 produced in the process. This article is one of the "last gasps" of the dying fossil fuel industry.

Oct 28, 2017
Why not? But something tells me the cars using that engine will be as expensive if not more than EVs. What the point then?

If you do the lifetime cost calcs (not just the purchasing price) then e.g. a Model 3 from Tesla already comes out considerably cheaper than a comparable ICE car.

Most people just see the up front cost and think that's all to owning a car. But you spend a lot more than the cost of the car itself during its lifetime on maintenance, fuel, insurance, etc.
The picture quickly looks different.if you factor all this in and then do the comparison.

Oct 29, 2017

If you do the lifetime cost calcs (not just the purchasing price) then e.g. a Model 3 from Tesla already comes out considerably cheaper than a comparable ICE car.


Yeah, the trick is just choosing the "comparable" car such that it serves your point.

Compare it to something the public actually drives, like a Ford Fiesta.

Did you notice its the globally "giant oil companies" that are funding this initiative to continue burning gasoline/diesel in cars rather than convert to electricity?


The point is reducing emissions where they can be reduced, instead of deferring the solution to some future pie-in-sky technology that will be too little and too late.

Oct 30, 2017
Why not? But something tells me the cars using that engine will be as expensive if not more than EVs. What the point then?

If you do the lifetime cost calcs (not just the purchasing price) then e.g. a Model 3 from Tesla already comes out considerably cheaper than a comparable ICE car.

Most people just see the up front cost and think that's all to owning a car. But you spend a lot more than the cost of the car itself during its lifetime on maintenance, fuel, insurance, etc.
The picture quickly looks different.if you factor all this in and then do the comparison.


My point exactly: What's the point of owning a brand new car with a Super Great New Omega engine if you can have EV's at the same cost?
Those who could afford those are those who could afford EV's in th first place. Poor people are probably once again out of the picture.

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