Semi-transparent perovskite solar cells for solar windows

May 22, 2017, The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST)
Typical solar cells today are made of crystalline silicon, which is difficult to make translucent. Credit: Liu Fuyu / 123rf

Scientists are exploring ways to develop transparent or semi-transparent solar cells as a substitute for glass walls in modern buildings with the aim of harnessing solar energy. But this has proven challenging, because transparency in solar cells reduces their efficiency in absorbing the sunlight they need to generate electricity.

Typical solar cells today are made of , which is difficult to make translucent. By contrast, semi-transparent solar cells use, for example, organic or dye-sensitized materials. But compared to crystalline silicon-based cells, their power-conversion efficiencies are relatively low. Perovskites are hybrid organic-inorganic photovoltaic materials, which are cheap to produce and easy to manufacture. They have recently received much attention, as the efficiency of has rapidly increased to the level of silicon technologies in the past few years.

Using perovskites, a Korean research team, led by Professor Seunghyup Yoo of the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology and Professor Nam-Gyu Park of Sungkyunkwan University, has developed a semi-transparent solar cell that is highly efficient and functions very effectively as a thermal mirror.

One key to achieving efficient semitransparent solar cells is to develop a for the cell's uppermost layer that is compatible with the photoactive material. The Korean team developed a 'top transparent electrode' (TTE) that works well with perovskite solar cells. The TTE is based on a multilayer stack consisting of a metal film sandwiched between a high refractive index layer and an interfacial buffer layer. This TTE, placed as a solar cell's top-most layer, can be prepared without damaging ingredients used in the development f perovskite solar cells. Unlike conventional transparent electrodes that only transmit visible light, the team's TTE plays the dual role of allowing visible light to pass through while at the same time reflecting infrared rays.

Prototype of a semi-transparent perovskite solar cell with thermal-mirror functionality. Credit: Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST)

The semi-transparent solar made with the TTEs exhibited an average power conversion efficiency as high as 13.3%, reflecting 85.5% of incoming infrared light. Currently available crystalline have up to 25% efficiency but are opaque.

The team believes that if the semi-transparent perovskite are scaled up for practical applications, they can be used in solar windows for buildings and automobiles, which not only generate electrical energy but also allow smart heat management in indoor environments, thereby utilizing more efficiently and effectively.

Thermal images are taken by an infrared camera to compare the heat rejection performance of automobile window film, semi-transparent solar cell and glass. Credit: Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST

Explore further: Team develops semi-transparent solar cells with thermal mirror capability

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PTTG
1 / 5 (1) May 23, 2017
This is part of the same solar woo that produced Solar Freaking Roadways.

Solar works when it faces the sun, when it's away from traffic and dust sources, and when it isn't partially shaded.

Cars and building facades have none of those features. If you want to make double use of space for solar, first build a thing that doesn't need sunlight, then build a roof over it and put panels on those.

Space efficiency is not what we need to improve with solar panels, it's cost efficiency. Fortunately for us, the levelized cost of power from solar is competitve and still improving.

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