New battery technologies take on lithium-ion

Battery

Lithium-ion batteries remain the technology-of-choice for today's crop of electric cars, but challengers are revving up to try to upset the current order. An article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, takes a look at two of the top contenders vying to erode lithium-ion's dominance.

Alex Scott, a senior editor at C&EN, reports on two developments from companies in England that seem poised to compete in the electric car market within the next two to four years. One is a sodium-ion version, produced by a start-up called Faradion. The other is a battery powered by lithium-sulfur technology and is being developed by Oxis Energy. Both companies assert their advances will be able to compete with lithium-ion in performance, safety and costs.

Some industry watchers, however, remain unconvinced by the claims, given that a slew of other battery-makers made similar promises and then failed to deliver. Soon enough, the fates of Faradion and Oxis could also be determined.

Faradion has set a goal to match the energy density of by 2017. And although they're still dealing with battery cycle issues, Oxis' lithium-sulfur technology has already attracted the attention of the military.


Explore further

The race is on to power the next generation of electric cars

Citation: New battery technologies take on lithium-ion (2015, July 22) retrieved 24 June 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-07-battery-technologies-lithium-ion.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
878 shares

Feedback to editors

User comments

Jul 22, 2015
And although they're still dealing with battery cycle issues, Oxis' lithium-sulfur technology has already attracted the attention of the military.

Not surprising as the military doesn't care about how many cycles a battery can sustain. At least not with the rate money is being shoveled into the military sector around the world.

Jul 22, 2015
What is the point of this article? I mean, in terms of actually telling us anything.... it doesn't talk about the science or technology behind the alternatives... it doesn't tell us pros and cons... it just says

"Lithium Ions are the thing now. Maybe in the future it might be another thing. We'll see."

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more