Researchers develop next-generation magnesium batteries

November 10, 2014, National Cheng Kung University

A Tainan-based National Cheng Kung University (NCKU) research team has developed next-generation magnesium batteries that could replace lithium batteries.

The team has been working on the research of magnesium battery, and has succeeded in overcoming the problems caused by the of magnesium and increasing the stability, Prof. Hung revealed.

Prof. Fei-Yi Hung said the stability of the magnesium battery prototype has been increased by controlling the reduction-oxidation effects and by the use of magnesium membrane electrodes and magnesium powder electrodes technology.

He also said, a magnesium battery's capacity is 8 to 12 times higher than a , and its charge-discharge efficiency is 5 times higher as well.

Take electric bicycles for example, a bicycle takes 3 hours to charge completely when using lithium battery while only 36 minutes if using magnesium battery, Prof. Hung added.

He said, devices powered by lithium batteries are usually unable to function properly in temperatures below minus-15°C.

However, the team found that if they coated lithium batteries with magnesium, they still worked at temperatures as low as minus-30°C and as high as 55°C.

"We hope the next-generation battery would be more environmentally friendly," according to Prof. Hung.

Because in the present generation the negative electrode is usually made from graphite, which is made from processed petroleum coke, he explained.

He added that not only are graphite electrodes less capable of storing energy, the processing of petroleum is less environmentally friendly.

While one of the greatest benefits of batteries is safety, according to Prof. Hung, the most difficult part in normalizing distribution is the difficulty of making electrolyte solvent.

Explore further: Developing the battery of the future

Related Stories

Developing the battery of the future

October 30, 2014

The search for the next generation of batteries has led researchers at the Canadian Light Source synchrotron to try new methods and materials that could lead to the development of safer, cheaper, more powerful, and longer-lasting ...

Dispelling a misconception about Mg-ion batteries

October 16, 2014

Lithium (Li)-ion batteries serve us well, powering our laptops, tablets, cell phones and a host of other gadgets and devices. However, for future automotive applications, we will need rechargeable batteries with significant ...

Recommended for you

Cryptocurrency rivals snap at Bitcoin's heels

January 14, 2018

Bitcoin may be the most famous cryptocurrency but, despite a dizzying rise, it's not the most lucrative one and far from alone in a universe that counts 1,400 rivals, and counting.

Top takeaways from Consumers Electronics Show

January 13, 2018

The 2018 Consumer Electronics Show, which concluded Friday in Las Vegas, drew some 4,000 exhibitors from dozens of countries and more than 170,000 attendees, showcased some of the latest from the technology world.

Finnish firm detects new Intel security flaw

January 12, 2018

A new security flaw has been found in Intel hardware which could enable hackers to access corporate laptops remotely, Finnish cybersecurity specialist F-Secure said on Friday.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.