More electric car charging points in Japan than gas stations

February 17, 2015
A Nissan employee demonstrates charging one of the country's Leaf electric vehicles using a smart home electricity supply cable in Yokohama, suburban Tokyo

Green-car sceptics take note: Japan now has more electric vehicle charging spots than gas stations.

The country's number-two automaker Nissan says there are now 40,000 charging units—including those inside private homes—across the nation, compared with 34,000 petrol stations.

While have multiple pumps and can service many more cars, the figures underscore efforts to boost green-vehicle infrastructure in Japan, long a leader in a sector that remains tiny globally.

Nissan is betting on growing demand for electric cars, while rival Toyota said it has been swamped by orders for its first mass market hydrogen fuel-cell car, the Mirai sedan.

Fuel-cell cars are seen as the Holy Grail of green cars as they are powered by a chemical reaction between hydrogen and oxygen, which emits nothing more harmful than water from its exhaust.

But a limited driving range and lack of refuelling stations have hampered development of the green-car sector, which environmentalists say could play a vital role in cutting and slowing global warming.

Explore further: Toyota to give away fuel-cell patents to boost industry

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11 comments

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Eikka
5 / 5 (1) Feb 17, 2015
While gas stations have multiple pumps and can service many more cars


Many -many- more cars. While one electric car sits 8 hours plugged up, a busy service station with two pumps serves 200 customers at 5 minute intervals between.

The comparison seems very contrived. Every electric car needs a charging station at home, while no regular car needs a personal pumping station. The figure of 34,000 rather shows how few electric cars there truly are.

nevermark
5 / 5 (3) Feb 17, 2015
As Eikka points out, this articles statistic is a little misleading, although it is still a significant milestone.

The large numbers of in-home charging stations are encouraging. That is a big advantage for electrical power.
Eikka
5 / 5 (1) Feb 17, 2015
The large numbers of in-home charging stations are encouraging. That is a big advantage for electrical power.


That's debateable.

An electric car consumes about as much energy in a year as a typical household, which means a neighborhood full of electric cars is in trouble with it's supply infrastructure having to handle twice the demand.

It's like the issue of everyone switching their tea kettle on at the same time after a certain TV show, except now you have everyone switching their electric car chargers on coming home from work, and then switching the tea kettle on as well.

And it gets worse the faster the people are allowed to charge their cars, because the instantaneous power demand goes up. At some point the power co. has to start controlling when and how much you're allowed to recharge your car, or you pay through the nose for the over-provisioning of the grid.

Egleton
3 / 5 (2) Feb 17, 2015
Whats the matter, petrol heads? If you lose your ICE you, lose your mojo? Such fragile egos!
Never mind- Rossi comes to the rescue.
http://coldfusion...mckubre/
sTv0
5 / 5 (1) Feb 18, 2015
"Every electric car needs a charging station at home".

Um, no. Every electric car *already has* a charging station at home. It's called an electrical outlet. Every home *already has* electricity, thus every home *already can* charge an electric car.
Can you refuel your gas car at your house?
gkam
3 / 5 (2) Feb 18, 2015
This is hilarious. Eikka, I can always count on you to dig up arguments against progress.

Do not stop, your points are valid, although superseded by developments and made irrelevant.

Would Eikka want more of this?
http://www.utilit.../364909/
Drjsa_oba
not rated yet Feb 23, 2015
"Every electric car needs a charging station at home".

Um, no. Every electric car *already has* a charging station at home. It's called an electrical outlet. Every home *already has* electricity, thus every home *already can* charge an electric car.
Can you refuel your gas car at your house?


If this was true the headline would have been 40 million charging stations in Japan not 40,000
Eikka
5 / 5 (1) Feb 24, 2015
Um, no. Every electric car *already has* a charging station at home. It's called an electrical outlet.


Regular outlets are rather slow for charging, which is the main reason why anyone would install a dedicated charging post. Many have to upgrade their mains breakers for the increased load anyways.

This is hilarious. Eikka, I can always count on you to dig up arguments against progress.


It's not an argument against progress, it's an argument against dubious reporting.

Having a false picture of the state of development is dangerous because it leads to a false sense of security.

These kinds of exaggerating propaganda makes it seem like the technology is much further ahead than it really is, which gives the message to politicians and their constituents that their efforts and investments are already well-placed and sufficient so no further action or policy review is necessary.

Eikka
5 / 5 (1) Feb 24, 2015
Would Eikka want more of this?


I think the decision to keep the plant running for another 3 years is justified.

The cost to keep the plant operating results in higher cost of power, but closing the plant today would result in a similiar increase due to reduced supply and increased investments driving the prices up until sufficient transmission capacity is built to buy the electricity from elsewhere.

It's cheaper to keep it while a proper replacement and decommissioning plan is being executed, rather than shut down immediately because of anti-nuclear hysteria.

But all this is not relevant here. Every time I point out a issue, you point out some off-topic problem adjacent to nuclear power. You're really just trying to pull a tu-quoque fallacy to draw attention away from the real issue at hand.

Eikka
3 / 5 (2) Feb 24, 2015
arguments against progress.


And really, the installation of a large number of fancy specialized electrical sockets in private homes is progress now?

The need for such a large number of these specialized charging posts for such a small number of electric cars is simply a downside of electric cars. It's yet another extra investment that electric car advocates are reluctant to admit into the cost of ownership of an EV.

A few years ago we were being told that the infrastructure for electric cars already exists because everyone can already charge at home at no extra cost, and now it turns out it was a lie.

gkam
1 / 5 (1) Feb 24, 2015
"A few years ago we were being told that the infrastructure for electric cars already exists because everyone can already charge at home at no extra cost, and now it turns out it was a lie."
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Eikka, you truly make me laugh.

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