Energy savings in the kitchen

Feb 11, 2014
Greg McKelvey

Because the kitchen contains many large and small appliances that are used daily, the kitchen is a good area to reduce energy.

The University of Alabama's Greg McKelvey shares some simple ways to help cut costs of energy and water.

  • Dishwashers use an average of 15 gallons of hot water per load, plus electricity needed to operate the machine. Operate your dishwasher only when it is filled to capacity, but not overloaded. This will cut the costs of energy, water and detergent.
  • Choose pots and pans that completely cover the heating elements. If the burner is larger than the pan, heat is being wasted. Use pans with flat bottoms and tight-fitting lids that hold heat and permit lower settings.
  • Keep refrigerator/freezer condenser coils clean and unobstructed for maximum energy savings. A tight-sealing door gasket is critical to the efficiency of your refrigerator. Close the door on a dollar bill. If you can easily pull the bill out, then the gasket needs replacing. Cover all liquids stored in the refrigerator. Moisture can be drawn into the air, making the unit work harder.
  • Look for blue flames in natural gas appliances; yellow flames indicate the gas is burning inefficiently and an adjustment may be needed.
  • When purchasing new , always look for Energy Star models. The Energy Guide label estimates the cost per year required to operate the appliance.

Explore further: Homes become members of the family with smart parts

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Team improves solar-cell efficiency

Sep 19, 2014

New light has been shed on solar power generation using devices made with polymers, thanks to a collaboration between scientists in the University of Chicago's chemistry department, the Institute for Molecular ...

Calif. teachers fund to boost clean energy bets

Sep 19, 2014

The California State Teachers' Retirement System says it plans to increase its investments in clean energy and technology to $3.7 billion, from $1.4 billion, over the next five years.

Idealistic Norwegian sun trappers

Sep 19, 2014

The typical Norwegian owner of a solar heating system is a resourceful man in his mid-fifties. He is technically skilled, interested in energy systems, and wants to save money and protect the environment.

User comments : 0