Amazon, Apple, Twitter score low on clean energy: study

Apr 17, 2012 by Glenn Chapman
Amazon, Apple and Twitter were graded poorly Tuesday in a Greenpeace study of technology titans' use of clean energy to power the mushrooming Internet cloud, but Facebook, Google and Yahoo! won praise.

Amazon, Apple and Twitter were graded poorly Tuesday in a Greenpeace study of technology titans' use of clean energy to power the mushrooming Internet cloud, but Facebook, Google and Yahoo! won praise.

The environmental charity's "How Clean is your Cloud?" report, billed as a rallying cry instead of a critique, related to the companies' use of data centers and other energy issues.

"We are not trying to give them a hard time, we are trying to build them up to do the right thing,"Greenpeace senior campaign specialist Casey Harrell told AFP.

"We love our iPhones, they make our lives better; but they shouldn't make the planet worse."

Cupertino, California-based Apple got "D" grades for efficiency of datacenters, sharing information about power use, and lobbying utilities to provide clean energy.

Apple was given a flunking "F" when it came to locating datacenters in places where electricity comes from clean sources instead of climate-ruining coal.

Apple, however, rejected the Greenpeace findings as outdated or flat-out wrong, and said it was leading the pack when it comes to shifting datacenters to clean energy.

The company's new North Carolina datacenter aims to get more than 60 percent of its power from renewable sources including an on-site solar farm and a fuel cell installation touted as the largest of their kind in the United States.

The facility will be "the greenest datacenter ever built" and will be joined next year by one in Oregon powered completely by renewable energy, according to Apple spokeswoman Kristin Huguet.

Amazon.com and its cloud-based Amazon Web Services got failing grades in all but datacenter energy efficiency, where it got a "D."

Technology firms tend to be tight-lipped about datacenter power use for competitive reasons, and Amazon.com said the information about it deduced by Greenpeace was "inaccurate."

"Amazon Web Services believes that cloud computing is inherently more environmentally friendly than traditional computing," the company said in response to an AFP inquiry.

"Instead of each company having their own datacenter that serves just them, AWS makes it possible for hundreds of thousands of companies to consolidate their datacenter use into a handful of datacenters in the AWS Cloud."

While datacenter efficiency is a worthwhile goal, switching to clean energy is needed to safeguard the health of the planet, according to Greenpeace.

The trend of software hosted in the Internet "cloud" to provide services such as Web-based email, video viewing, picture sharing, social networking and "tweeting" is driving demand for datacenters.

If the world's datacenters were considered a country, it would rank fifth when it came to electricity consumption in a global ranking of nations, according to Greenpeace.

A major factor in locating datacenters has been cheap electricity, resulting in them being built in places where utilities generate power by burning coal, a prime source of climate changing carbon gas emissions.

Datacenters are so coveted as customers by power companies that technology companies have clout to press for a switch to clean energy sources, according to Greenpeace.

"The explosive growth of datacenters is a big problem if it continues to be linked to coal, or a big opportunity," said Greenpeace media officer David Pomerantz.

"If the IT sector pushes to bring solar, wind and other renewables online it could be a huge game changer."

Google has been investing aggressively in renewable energy. Facebook in December implemented a policy making the availability of clean power a criterion for where it builds datacenters.

"We've put a significant time and resources into making Google as energy efficient as possible, using renewable energy, and investing in the sector," said Google senior vice president for technical infrastructure Urs Hoelzle.

"We welcome reports like this, as they bring additional attention to these important issues for the industry."

Internet pioneer Yahoo! was an early adopter of putting datacenters in places with renewable energy sources.

The list of companies graded included IBM, Microsoft, Hewlett-Packard, Oracle, and Salesforce.com.

"These guys aren't the enemies," Pomerantz said of the 14 technology firms graded.

"The enemies are the Duke Energy(s) of the world blowing up mountains to provide power," he added.

Explore further: First of four Fukushima reactors cleared of nuclear fuel

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Facebook, Greenpeace in truce over data centers

Dec 15, 2011

(AP) -- Facebook and Greenpeace have called a truce over a clean energy feud that had the environmental group using the social network's own platform to campaign against it.

Greenpeace wants Facebook center off coal fuel

Sep 01, 2010

(AP) -- Greenpeace said about 500,000 Facebook users have urged the world's largest social network to abandon plans to buy electricity from a coal-based energy company for its new data center in the U.S.

Renewables could bring job boon to Poland: Greenpeace

Mar 11, 2011

An ambitious switch from fossil fuels to green energy could generate up to 350,000 new jobs by 2020 in the Poland, the European Union's most coal-dependent member, Greenpeace said Friday in Warsaw.

Recommended for you

The state of shale

Dec 19, 2014

University of Pittsburgh researchers have shared their findings from three studies related to shale gas in a recent special issue of the journal Energy Technology, edited by Götz Veser, the Nickolas A. DeCecco Professor of Che ...

Website shines light on renewable energy resources

Dec 18, 2014

A team from the University of Arizona and eight southwestern electric utility companies have built a pioneering web portal that provides insight into renewable energy sources and how they contribute to the ...

Better software cuts computer energy use

Dec 18, 2014

An EU research project is developing tools to help software engineers create energy-efficient code, which could reduce electricity consumption at data centres by up to 50% and improve battery life in smart ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.