Video: Do anti-wrinkle creams work?

June 13, 2017, American Chemical Society
Credit: American Chemical Society

Want a younger, more perfect-looking you? Skin can stay firm and stretchy thanks to protein fibers called collagen and elastin in the tissue beneath the surface.

But environmental factors like smoking or from the sun can produce antioxidants that damage skin cells' ability to make more of these supports. Anti-wrinkle treatments claim they keep the skin surface fresh and rejuvenate these cells, but do they work?

To find out whether an over-the-counter jar of cream could make 40 the new 20, we dive into the science:

Explore further: Action spectrum of sun skin damage documented

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