Panasonic Starts Mass-Production of High-Capacity 3.1 Ah Lithium-ion Battery

Dec 18, 2009

Panasonic Corporation developed a 18650-type high-capacity 3.1 Ah lithium-ion battery and began mass production of the battery this December. The new 3.1 Ah battery has a nickel positive electrode and an energy density of 675 Wh/L. The same type (18 mm in diameter x 65 mm in length) of batteries are widely used in laptop computers.

Demand for lithium-ion batteries is growing as a power source for mobile devices such as laptop computers and mobile phones because their high energy density and light weight properties are suitable for these applications. As such devices become more sophisticated and powerful, they require more robust and safer batteries that do not cause abnormal heating.

The company successfully achieved safety and high capacity by using its unique Heat Resistance Layer (HRL) technology that forms an insulating layer between the positive and negative electrodes. The layer prevents the battery from overheating even if a occurs.

Capitalizing on this technology, Panasonic commercialized a high-capacity 2.9 Ah lithium-ion battery with a nickel positive electrode (energy density: 620 Wh/L) in 2006. Based on the cell construction with the nickel positive electrode and the HRL, the company added improvements to the battery and succeeded in developing the 3.1 Ah lithium-ion battery, the industry's highest capacity in the 18650-type.

The new battery provides long-lasting power to laptops. This high energy density battery can also contribute to downsizing and weight reduction of portable devices. With adoption of the nickel positive , the new rechargeable battery excels in durability in actual use and charge retention - the battery can be stored for a long period of time because of low self-discharge.

Panasonic will continue to refine its battery technology to deliver lithium-ion batteries combining safety with high capacity and use this technology to develop commercially viable green systems.

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User comments : 3

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joekid
5 / 5 (2) Dec 18, 2009
? whats the charge life between use and need to recharge? weight? cost? These not supplied article not useful or very informative. (Pure AD)
Sepp
5 / 5 (2) Dec 19, 2009
Without any added data, the jump from 2.9 Ah to 3.1 Ah doesn't seem very significant, neither does the increase in energy density from 620 Wh/L to 675 Wh/L (which I suppose means Watt hours per Liter).

I agree with joekid that the article is just taken over from a company press release...
nick7201969
5 / 5 (1) Dec 24, 2009
details please. how much longer than the average laptop battery???? i don't see it in the article

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