US announces new fuel economy standard for 2011

Mar 27, 2009
Drivers wait in traffic on 42nd Street in Midtown Manhattan during the morning rush hour April 1, 2008 in New York City. The US administration Friday announced updated automobile fuel efficiency standards for new vehicles starting with the 2011 model year that aim to reduce gasoline consumption and emissions.

The US administration Friday announced updated automobile fuel efficiency standards for new vehicles starting with the 2011 model year that aim to reduce gasoline consumption and emissions.

The new rules aim at implementing a 2007 law mandating better efficiency.

The new standards will raise the industry-wide combined average to 27.3 miles (43.9 kilometers) per gallon (3.8 liters), a increase of 2.0 miles per gallon over the 2010 model year average, the Transportation Department said in a statement.

The change "will save about 887 million gallons of fuel and reduce by 8.3 million metric tonnes," the agency said.

Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood said that work on the multi-year plan for model years after 2011 is already well underway.

The administration of president George W. Bush had proposed new standards but in January scrapped the effort, leaving the update until after the presidential transition.

On January 26, President directed the Transportation Department to finalize the 2011 model year standard by the end of March.

(c) 2009 AFP

Explore further: Shedding light on solar power

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

NREL Estimates U.S. Hybrid Electric Vehicle Fuel Savings

Jun 21, 2007

Hybrid electric vehicles have saved close to 230 million gallons – or 5.5 million barrels – of fuel in the United States since their introduction in 1999, according to a recent analysis conducted at the U. S. Department ...

Recommended for you

Shedding light on solar power

18 hours ago

Everyone wants to save energy, but not everyone knows where to start. Grid Resources, a startup based out of the Centre for Urban Energy's iCUE incubator, is developing a new website that seeks to help homeowners ...

Energy transition project moves into its second phase

19 hours ago

Siemens is studying new concepts for optimizing the cost-effectiveness and technical performance of energy systems with distributed and fluctuating electricity production. The associated IRENE research project ...

Smart data increases the efficiency of wind farms

21 hours ago

Siemens monitors thousands of wind power plants around the world to operate them as efficiently as possible. The company recently opened a remote diagnostics center in Brande, Denmark, where sensor data from ...

User comments : 6

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Velanarris
5 / 5 (1) Mar 27, 2009
Changing the standard for new cars is useless if you don't have a plan to get older vehicles off the road without infringing upon your populace.
Royale
5 / 5 (1) Mar 27, 2009
but how do you decide what older vehicles even? I have a 1996 honda civic and get about 30mpg. so they can't just go by age. and they can't just take out gas guzzlers, or say goodbye to your new hummer.

I guess you'd have to have the best of both worlds, get the old and gas guzzling cars off the road.

But then what? Does the government pay the owners of that $400 car they just took off the road? Chances are they can only afford another $400 car, which almost leads to a catch22. The only way to avoid that would be pushing old Cadillac owners into civics of equal value, but then that goes against Obama's bail out of American Auto.

What to do, what to do?
dirk_bruere
2.3 / 5 (3) Mar 27, 2009
I get 50mpg from my VW 2.0 Diesel
Doug_Huffman
2.3 / 5 (3) Mar 27, 2009
'03 1.9L TDI ~45 mpg
E_L_Earnhardt
2 / 5 (1) Mar 27, 2009
No way could one size fit all! Trucks, vans, heavy luxery veh. could not pass muster! A "Per Pound" system has some merit, but the "Hummer" would sell
like hot-cakes!
Modernmystic
2.3 / 5 (3) Mar 28, 2009
Feel good political meaningless Bull#("%...

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.