Related topics: greenhouse gas emissions · biofuel · oil

Renewable energy targets can undermine sustainable intentions

Renewable energy targets (RETs) may be too blunt a tool for ensuring a sustainable future, according to University of Queensland-led research. Ph.D. candidate Scott Spillias, from UQ's School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, ...

Fossil fuel subsidies need global reform, say experts

Fossil fuels still receive most of the international government support provided to the energy sector despite their "well-known environmental and public health damage," according to new research from Rice University's Baker ...

Does going green pay off?

Does going green pay off? Research published in the World Review of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development hopes to answer that question from a sustainability performance perspective.

Waste-to-energy plants add to Delhi's pollution woes

An official report admitting to toxic emissions being generated by three waste-to-energy (WtE) plants operating in the Indian capital has thrown a question mark on the future of WtE incinerators as a way to deal with the ...

Carbon accounting must include city greenery, researchers say

The Los Angeles basin is often thought of as a dry, smoggy, overdeveloped landscape. But a new study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows that the manicured lawns, emerald golf courses and trees ...

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Fuel

Fuel is any material that is burned or altered to obtain energy and to heat or to move an object. Fuel releases its energy either through a chemical reaction means, such as combustion, or nuclear means, such as nuclear fission or nuclear fusion. An important property of a useful fuel is that its energy can be stored to be released only when needed, and that the release is controlled in such a way that the energy can be harnessed to produce work. Examples: Methane, Petrol and Oil.

All carbon-based life forms—from microorganisms to animals and humans—depend on and use fuels as their source of energy. Their cells engage in an enzyme-mediated chemical process called metabolism that converts energy from food or light into a form that can be used to sustain life. Additionally, humans employ a variety of techniques to convert one form of energy into another, producing usable energy for purposes that go far beyond the energy needs of a human body. The application of energy released from fuels ranges from heat to cooking and from powering weapons to combustion and generation of electricity.

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