Related topics: greenhouse gas emissions · biofuel · oil

Biofuels that could be made from seawater

Researchers from the University of Manchester are using synthetic biology to explore a more efficient way to produce the next generation of biobased jet fuels—partly made from seawater.

Six degrees of nuclear separation

Argonne scientists look to 3-D printing to ease separation anxiety, which paves the way to recycle more nuclear material.

Total loses bid for palm oil tax break

France's constitutional court rejected on Friday a bid by oil firm Total to secure a tax break for using controversial palm oil to create biofuel.

New tool visualizes nature's benefits worldwide

Nature supports people in critical ways, often at a highly local level. Wild bees buzz through farms, pollinating vegetables as they go. Nearby, wetlands might remove chemicals from the farm's runoff, protecting a community ...

Aerial photographs shed light on Mont Blanc ice loss

In 1919, the Swiss pilot and photographer Walter Mittelholzer flew over Mont Blanc in a biplane photographing the alpine landscape. Exactly 100 years later, researchers from the University of Dundee in Scotland have recreated ...

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Fuel

Fuel is any material that is burned or altered to obtain energy and to heat or to move an object. Fuel releases its energy either through a chemical reaction means, such as combustion, or nuclear means, such as nuclear fission or nuclear fusion. An important property of a useful fuel is that its energy can be stored to be released only when needed, and that the release is controlled in such a way that the energy can be harnessed to produce work. Examples: Methane, Petrol and Oil.

All carbon-based life forms—from microorganisms to animals and humans—depend on and use fuels as their source of energy. Their cells engage in an enzyme-mediated chemical process called metabolism that converts energy from food or light into a form that can be used to sustain life. Additionally, humans employ a variety of techniques to convert one form of energy into another, producing usable energy for purposes that go far beyond the energy needs of a human body. The application of energy released from fuels ranges from heat to cooking and from powering weapons to combustion and generation of electricity.

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