Hybrid Bus in the City: A Prototype with a Future

Aug 20, 2007
Hybrid Bus in the City: A Prototype with a Future
Nuremberg's public transport system has become more "electrified" thanks to a diesel-electric hybrid bus developed by MAN. The vehicle is equipped with drive-system technology from Siemens. The prototype, which also features a special brake energy recovery system, uses up to 25 percent less fuel than conventional buses. The drive system consists of series-produced components, which means mass production of the bus is a possibility that MAN is planning to turn into reality by 2010.

Nuremberg’s public transport system has become more "electrified" thanks to a diesel-electric hybrid bus developed by MAN. The vehicle is equipped with drive-system technology from Siemens.

The prototype, which also features a special brake energy recovery system, uses up to 25 percent less fuel than conventional buses. The drive system consists of series-produced components, which means mass production of the bus is a possibility that MAN is planning to turn into reality by 2010.

In addition to a combustion engine, hybrid vehicles have an electric motor that initially puts the vehicle in motion. This system has a particularly positive effect on fuel consumption in urban driving situations and during rush hour. The electric motor also serves as a generator: When the vehicle brakes, the kinetic energy is not lost, but is instead converted into electricity and stored. This energy is later used to power the vehicle. Hybrid drives are ideal for city buses, which brake and accelerate frequently (e.g. at bus stops and traffic lights).

Working together with specialists from MAN, Siemens Automation and Drives (A&D) connected a diesel engine to an electric power pack consisting of generators, frequency converters, drive motors, and transmission components. The system is now being tested in the Lion’s City Hybrid prototype bus, which operates in Nuremberg.

Depending on engine rpm, energy management software from A&D regulates the energy flow from the electric or diesel drive, and then transfers this energy to the bus drive shaft via the transmission. Special high-performance capacitors store the energy and then supply enough of it to put the vehicle in motion. The prototype has been operating successfully, and MAN is confident that it can begin mass producing the hybrid bus in Europe by 2010 at the latest.

In the meantime, the third test hybrid bus from A&D and MAN has now hit the road in Nuremberg. The Nuremberg buses aren’t the only ones with technology from Siemens, however, as there are currently 1,000 hybrid buses on the road equipped with A&D systems that are being tested in some 30 different projects.

Source: Siemens

Explore further: Researchers develop unique waste cleanup for rural areas

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Indonesia to ratify ASEAN haze agreement

1 hour ago

Indonesia's parliament on Tuesday voted to ratify a regional agreement on cross-border haze as fires ripped through forests in the west of the country, choking neighbouring Singapore with hazardous smog.

White House backs use of body cameras by police

3 hours ago

Requiring police officers to wear body cameras is one potential solution for bridging deep mistrust between law enforcement and the public, the White House said, weighing in on a national debate sparked by the shooting of ...

Recommended for you

Idealistic Norwegian sun trappers

2 hours ago

The typical Norwegian owner of a solar heating system is a resourceful man in his mid-fifties. He is technically skilled, interested in energy systems, and wants to save money and protect the environment.

Peugeot hybrid compressed-air car set for Paris Motor Show

21 hours ago

An 860-kilogram concept city car from Peugeot indicates impressive fuel economy. This latest concept "has its sights set on meeting the French government's goal of putting an affordable 2.0l/100km (141mpg) car into production by 2020," said Jordan Bis ...

User comments : 0