Zero emission cars in Norway win world's biggest market share

January 6, 2016
Electric cars heading for Oslo crowd the bus lane (L) during the morning rush hour on the E-18 road in Hoevik on August 19, 2014
Electric cars heading for Oslo crowd the bus lane (L) during the morning rush hour on the E-18 road in Hoevik on August 19, 2014

Zero emission cars accounted for 17.1 percent of new car registrations last year in Norway, the industry said on Wednesday, the highest market share for clean vehicles anywhere in the world.

"Never has the of been as high as in 2015," Christina Bu of the Norwegian Association for Electric Cars said.

Almost 26,000 zero emission cars—all of them electric except for nine hydrogen vehicles—were registered last year in the Scandinavian country, out of a total of 150,700 private new cars, the Information Council for Road Traffic said.

The most sold models were the electric version of Volkswagen's Golf, the Tesla S, Nissan's Leaf, the BMW i3 and the Renault Zoe.

In 2014, zero emission cars made up 12.5 percent of the Norwegian market.

The Scandinavian country is cementing its role as a pioneer in the field. By comparison, in neighbouring Sweden green cars represented four percent of new car registrations last year, while in France they accounted for just 0.9 percent.

Norway offers numerous incentives to encourage buyers to opt for green cars: while regular cars are heavily taxed, green car owners benefit from tax exemptions, and, under certain conditions, the use of collective transport lanes and free parking.

Authorities plan however to very gradually reduce some of benefits, controversial due to their high cost.

"The choice of a zero car has to remain profitable. The electric car market is still not viable without subsidies," insisted Christina Bu.

Explore further: Tesla S electric car tops registrations in Norway

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Eikka
3 / 5 (2) Jan 06, 2016
The irony is that the Norwegians are importing electric cars on money the earn by exporting oil.

No oil, no electric cars.

The electric cars are completey tax exempt so the rich can write off $100k+ worth in tax deductions in buying a Tesla Model S. It's an investment, similiar to buying an expensive painting to hide your money from the taxman, which is why even second hand Teslas have been sold for more money than new ones straight from the factory.

antialias_physorg
5 / 5 (1) Jan 06, 2016
The irony is that the Norwegians are importing electric cars on money the earn by exporting oil.

No oil, no electric cars.

OK, I normally don't rate you (or anyone) down - but that takes the cake as the most stupid comment on physorg. Ever.
Eikka
5 / 5 (1) Jan 06, 2016

OK, I normally don't rate you (or anyone) down - but that takes the cake as the most stupid comment on physorg. Ever.


Why? What exactly is so stupid about it?

The fact of the matter is that the Norwegian economy revolves around exporting their natural resources - oil and gas. It's the biggest petroleum exporter in western Europe - the Saudi Arabia of the north.

The reason why they can afford such extensive subsidies on green transportation is directly due to selling fossil fuels. Their economy is so much based on fossil fuels that they've literally made a national fund and put away tax money for decades because they know it's going to end soon, so they're buying time to figure out what to do next.

Eikka
5 / 5 (1) Jan 06, 2016
Norway has three major natural resources: oil, gas and hydroelectricity. They're producing about 80 million tons on crude oil, 85 million tons of refined oil, and 100 billion cubic meters of natural gas a year.

The fossil fuel energy exports amount to roughly 2000 TWh a year, while the electricity production is around 120 TWh a year and there's an estimated 85 TWh a year in untapped hydroelectric capacity as far as I remember. That is to say, if they were to drop the fossil fuel export business and concentrate on exporting hydroelectricity - acting as a huge battery for Europe - their actual energy export would shrink to around 10% of what it is today, and as a result their national income would take a huge hit.

So there's a real scramble to figure out what the hell they're going to do in the future, which is why they can't ultimately afford the electric car subsidies either. So the irony is that the whole green movement in Norway is literally running on oil.
EnviroEquipment_Com
1 / 5 (1) Jan 06, 2016
I understand that electric cars don't emit harmful emissions the technically speaking that doesn't mean they are zero-emission-vehicles as there are tons of fossil fuel burned to the electricity used to power them. For the record, hydrogen vehicles are truly zero emission although finding a station that will fill the tank on this vehicle is next to impossible.
gkam
1 / 5 (3) Jan 06, 2016
" the whole green movement in Norway is literally running on oil"
------------------------------------

Great idea!

Set up a system for cleaner and renewable power sources and make the old technology, set to run out of fuel, fund it.

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