Nissan recalls over 188,000 SUVs to fix brakes (Update)

October 23, 2013

Nissan Motor Co. is recalling more than 188,000 Nissan and Infiniti SUVs worldwide to fix faulty brake control software that could increase the risk of a crash.

The recall covers some Nissan Pathfinders from the 2013 and 2014 model years, as well as the 2013 Infiniti JX35 and its successor model, the 2014 QX60.

Nissan says that during light braking on rough roads, the antilock brake software could cause longer-than-expected stopping distances. The company said no crashes or injuries have been reported.

Nissan will notify owners within 60 days, and dealers will reprogram the antilock brakes free of charge.

The recall includes nearly 152,000 SUVs in the U.S. and roughly 36,000 in China, Canada, Mexico and other countries, the company said.

The Pathfinders were built between April 18, 2012 and Sept. 20 of this year. The JX35s were built from Sept. 15, 2011 to Jan. 16 of this year, while the QX60s were built from Jan. 17 to Sept. 20 of this year.

Explore further: Nissan sells out electric Leaf before it hits US showrooms

Related Stories

Nissan shows safety features, electronic steering

October 17, 2012

Electronically managed steering that completely bypasses the mechanical link of a clutch is among the new safety technology from Japanese automaker Nissan. Other vehicles are smart enough to park themselves. And some swerve ...

Chrysler recalling 142,000 pickups, SUVs

October 1, 2013

Chrysler is recalling more than 142,000 pickup trucks and SUVs worldwide because of software glitches that could affect instrument cluster lighting and braking systems.

Recommended for you

Nevada researchers trying to turn roadside weed into biofuel

November 26, 2015

Three decades ago, a University of Nevada researcher who obtained one of the first U.S. Energy Department grants to study the potential to turn plants into biofuels became convinced that a roadside weed—curly top gumweed—was ...

Glider pilots aim for the stratosphere

November 20, 2015

Talk about serendipity. Einar Enevoldson was strolling past a scientist's office in 1991 when he noticed a freshly printed image tacked to the wall. He was thunderstruck; it showed faint particles in the sky that proved something ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.