S. Korea tests 'electric road' for public buses

Aug 08, 2013
South Korean passengers queue at a bus termial in Seoul on September 10, 2011. A South Korean city has begun testing an "electrified road" that allows electric public buses to recharge their batteries from buried cables as they travel.

A South Korean city has begun testing an "electrified road" that allows electric public buses to recharge their batteries from buried cables as they travel.

The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), which developed the system, said Thursday it would be tested over the next four months on a 24-kilometre (15-mile) route in the southern city of Gumi.

Pick-up equipment underneath the bus, or Online Electric Vehicle (OLEV), sucks up power through non-contact magnetic charging from strips buried under the .

It then distributes the power either to drive the vehicle or for

As a result it requires a battery only one-fifth the size of conventional .

The system also eliminates the need for overhead wires used to power conventional trams or trolley buses.

The technology does not come cheap, with each OLEV costing around 700 million won ($630,000).

"The technology is readily available but the question is how to bring down the cost," said Park Jong-Han, manager of the company that produced the OLEV prototypes.

"Once the cost goes down, I believe more cities will be interested in commercialising the new ," Park told AFP.

The system has already been partially trialled on a much smaller scale at an amusement park and on the KAIST campus.

Electrifying the road does not require major construction work, as the recharging stations only have to be buried along 10-15 percent of the route at places such as .

Explore further: Wireless Online Electric Vehicle, OLEV, runs inner city roads

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User comments : 8

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ScottyB
5 / 5 (1) Aug 08, 2013
About time some one did this, wonder how much it costs to retro fit this to existing roads
Anonym
1 / 5 (4) Aug 08, 2013
Hopefully, they have epidemiologists standing by to determine to what extent this technology is carcinogenic.
Gmr
2 / 5 (6) Aug 08, 2013
Hopefully, they have epidemiologists standing by to determine to what extent this technology is carcinogenic.

I'm more interested from the aspect of how many injuries due to electric shock and maintenance this will prevent versus an above-ground electric powered rail.

Besides, you can always wear your tinfoil hat on the bus. Nobody will stare. Much.
antialias_physorg
4.8 / 5 (5) Aug 08, 2013
Hopefully, they have epidemiologists standing by to determine to what extent this technology is carcinogenic.

Since the emitter and the receiver are right next to one another the stray fields should be minimal (and certainly not in the high frequency ranges of, say, cell phones which would pose a polarization risk in cells).
Wolf358
5 / 5 (2) Aug 08, 2013
Hopefully, they have epidemiologists standing by to determine to what extent this technology is carcinogenic.

Since the emitter and the receiver are right next to one another the stray fields should be minimal (and certainly not in the high frequency ranges of, say, cell phones which would pose a polarization risk in cells).


Also, if they're smart, they'll have the thing controlled by a sensor which only energizes it if there's a vehicle in range and shuts it off otherwise.
antonima
2.3 / 5 (3) Aug 09, 2013
Perhaps it will decrease jaywalking as well?
antialias_physorg
5 / 5 (2) Aug 09, 2013
Also, if they're smart, they'll have the thing controlled by a sensor which only energizes it if there's a vehicle in range and shuts it off otherwise.

Pretty certain about that. Anything else would be HUGELY wasteful, as otherwise you'd have a series of antennas blasting at full power into empty space.
They'll probably use something for switching like in the electrified road tests done by Volvo
http://phys.org/n...ric.html
Eikka
1 / 5 (1) Aug 11, 2013
Since the emitter and the receiver are right next to one another the stray fields should be minimal


If they are using induction, the stray fields will be minimal beyond a foot of distance. Still, stray induced currents and low efficiency will be a problem.

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