Snow helps solar cells sometimes, research shows

Oct 28, 2012
solar cell

Snow and solar cells aren't mutually exclusive, according to a Michigan Technological University scientist. Photovoltaic panels can be well worth the investment even if you live in a winter wonderland.

True, a layer of can cause a solar-cell blackout for awhile. But not many locales enjoy heavy snow for more than a few months. And even in the bleak midwinter, panels don't usually stay snow-covered for long.

"Sometimes snow actually helps ," says Michigan Tech's Joshua Pearce. He's referring to the albedo effect, when sunlight reflects off snow. It can make a panel generate more electricity in the same way that it gives skiers sunburn on sunny winter days.

With researchers from St. Lawrence College and Queen's University, in Kingston, Ontario, and a team of 20 industry partners, Pearce studied the effect of snow on the Open Solar Outdoors Test Field. They created a computer model to predict how much power generation would decline in various amounts of snow cover and on different types of solar modules mounted at different angles, from flat to steeply pitched. Then they validated their model with data from many of Ontario's huge commercial solar farms.

"In most cases power losses are minimal, even in snowy Canada," Pearce said. However, the group has developed a model that can be used to design the most efficient , no matter how much snow is in the area.

Pearce and R. W. Andrews have authored paper based on a preliminary study, "Prediction of Energy Effects on Photovoltaic Systems Due to Snowfall Events," published in proceedings of the 2012 38th IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference.

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More information: full paper

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antialias_physorg
not rated yet Oct 29, 2012
With thin film solar becoming dirt cheap we should think about covering arable land in winter with it.

Extra income for the farmers, protection ofthe soil from wind erosion and additional energy during the part of the year where it's needed most. It's win-win-win.