Poll: Germans accept nuke exit despite rising bill

October 21, 2012

A new poll finds that a large majority of Germans back the government's decision to phase out nuclear power and switch to renewable energies within a decade, despite rising electricity bills.

The poll for German news magazine Focus published Sunday found that 72 percent continue to support the country's energy switchover. Only 24 percent were opposed to the policy.

Germany's grid operators announced earlier this month that a surcharge on households' financing the expansion of renewable energies will increase by 47 percent starting in January. A typical family of four will then have to pay about €250 ($325) per year on top of their bill.

Polling agency Forsa surveyed 1,000 people this week. Focus did not provide the poll's margin of error.

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3 / 5 (6) Oct 21, 2012
A couple of points. First: once renewable non-nuclear energy sources are established, and no new infrastructures pertaining thereto are needed, then electricity prices will no doubt plummet. Second: this is good preparation for the worst-case scenario. Nuclear power plants are prime targets in the event of catastrophic conflict. No-one wants another Chernobyl or Fukushima.
2.3 / 5 (3) Oct 21, 2012
Sure. This is going to be fun to watch.
not rated yet Oct 22, 2012
About $27.00 per month...less than $1.00 per day. For non nuclear power...be leaders in energy independence which will translate to an economic growth engine for the next 20 years as it spurs local economic jobs and growth and other countries pay German companies to help them become more energy independent.
The Germans know what they are doing. We as Americans need to step the plate and treat the race to energy independence as the same as us racing the Soviet Union to the Moon in the 1960's. The positive economic benefit from the Space Race was felt for the next 20 years with all the spin off technologies.

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