Slovenian adventurer embarks on eco-friendly world trip

Jan 08, 2012
Matevz Lenarcic, Slovenian pilot, biologist and photographer, prepares before taking off from Ljubljana airport for a flight around the world in a 290 kilograms (640 lb) airplane consuming the smallest amount of fuel ever. During the trip, Lenarcic, in a ultra-light Pipistrel Virus-SW914, will cross some 100,000 kilometres (62,000 miles) hoping to circle the world westbound in two months.

Slovenian adventurer Matevz Lenarcic flew out of the capital Ljubljana on Sunday at the start of an eco-friendly trip around the world in an ultra-light plane boasting super-low fuel mileage.

"I want to make people understand that this world is the only one we've been given and if we destroy it, we and our descendants will be losing it for good," Lenarcic told AFP ahead of the solo adventure dubbed GreenLight WorldFlight.

Lenarcic hopes to fly the Pipistrel Virus-SW914 weighing just 290 kilograms (640 pounds) some 100,000 kilometres (62,000 miles), circling the world westbound in two and a half months.

His first stop will be Morocco, followed by Senegal, from where he will embark across the Atlantic Ocean.

Lenarcic plans to overfly seven continents, 60 countries, 120 national parks, the world's highest mountains including , cross three oceans and the Antarctic, while burning the smallest amount of unleaded fuel per distance flown.

The accomplished aerial photographer will take pictures as well as measure the concentration of and light absorbing carbonaceous aerosols (LACA) in regions where such measurements have not been made before.

Climatologists are studying the role of these particles in .

The project is backed by Slovenian light Pipistrel.

In collaboration with Penn State University in the United States, the plane maker Pipistrel was awarded NASA's Green Aviation prize in 2011 after succeeding in flying a different, electric aircraft 200 miles in less than two hours while using the equivalent in electricity of just over a half-gallon of fuel per occupant.

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signoftimes
5 / 5 (1) Jan 08, 2012
Super low fuel mileage. Wow. Just. Wow.
TheSpiceIsLife
not rated yet Jan 09, 2012
Did I miss the bit where the "super low fuel mileage" is specified?
theken101
not rated yet Jan 12, 2012
According to the company's website, the 80hp model consumes 3.6 gph at 133 knots.