The 70 kilo single person plane

The 70 kilo single person plane

(PhysOrg.com) -- Aki Suokas, a Finnish aeronautical engineer, has just finished creating a unique single-seat aircraft this week. The project was completed at Aero Friedrichshafen, and it has been dubbed the FlyNano.

The FlyNano is made up completely of a that makes this very light. The whole of the plane weighs only 70 kilograms in total. This weight class may actually make this plane light enough that the pilot may not need a license to fly it, depending on your flight path. The plane both takes off and lands on water, and comes in three versions.

The 70 kilo single person plane

The first version, one electric only, and two fuel based versions. The electric-only version has a 20kW engine. The two petrol-based engined run on 24 bhp and 35 bhp, respectively. The top speed on these planes is roughly 140 km/h, with a minimum speed of 70 km/h . The FlyNano has a of five meters. The plan can support a take off weight of 200 kg, as well as a take off speed of about 70km/h. In theory, the can travel about up to 70 kilometers in a single fueling, or charging, depending on the model that you have chosen to fly.

The 70 kilo single person plane

If you want to own one of these planes it will cost you about $39,000, for the least expensive of these three models. Orders on the FlyNano will be taken in three months from now, so you have some time to save up the cash if you really want to have this one man craft for yourself.

The FlyNano has been officially launched at Aero 2011 show at Friedrichshafen, Germany, 13 – 16 April.


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More information: www.flynano.com/

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Apr 15, 2011
no video of this thing. anyone ever see the the actual plane?

Apr 15, 2011
No pictures of videos of an actual craft anywhere on the internet, as far as i can tell via a couple of searches. Are they taking orders before they've even made a prototype?

Apr 15, 2011
No comment!

Apr 15, 2011
Is it real? If so, so cool!

Apr 15, 2011
Look at the CriCri designed by Micheal Colomban (Concorde engineer)Same weight and first flew in 1971 or 74. That ones
got a very good track record as well and a full canopy. Interesting design this but lots of vaporware designs out there that ship lots of sales sheets (nice one)but not much else.

Apr 15, 2011
so basically if you fly this thing at top speed you only get a half hours worth of flight if that, i really only see this as being a novelty item.

Apr 15, 2011
Better do it on a warm day. Flying in the cold can easily lead to frostbite in such an open cockpit. This is not an 'ultralite' that flies at often less than 25mph in gliding modes, it is an aircraft with a stall speed ('minimum speed') of 70mph. At that speed even 60deg F can seem very cold as the air takes water from your body.

EWH
Apr 16, 2011
No, stall speed is 70kph = 43.5mph = 37.8kts

Apr 16, 2011
Small correction there - stall speed is 70 KILOMETERS per hour.

Apr 16, 2011
Is this the high tech version of yesterdays bi-plane?

Apr 16, 2011
Is this the high tech version of yesterdays bi-plane?


There is nothing wrong with bi-plane design. It is a maximum lift design approach for minimal overall footprint in the early days of gutless primitive engines. If modern materials can made it useful, why not?

Apr 16, 2011
I call fake. It could use some ailerons, side pontoons and a windscreen, for starters. Dip one wing in the water at speed and the party will quickly be over. And no instruments? That'll be fun, too, especially for untrained "pilots." And you can't do seat-of-the-pants airspeed estimation because the prop is blowing in your face. I'd guess there is no video for a very good reason. On landing, when this thing turns into a boat at 35 mph -- wahoo!! Have you ever been on what is essentially a kayak going 35 mph? Boy howdy!

Apr 16, 2011
Sorry, I just noticed, there are instruments. My bad. Put me down for two.

Apr 16, 2011
English Channel? Meh! With this you can literally spit on it. Time to man the beaches.

Apr 16, 2011
This design seems to be a little light in wing area. Looks like a deathtrap to me. If you want a small safe plane get a Rutan.

Apr 17, 2011
Standingbear forgets that all our early pioneer flyers flew in aircraft that had open cockpits.

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